CEMU PLUGIN LOADER MAKES IT EASY TO LOAD IN DLL PLUGINS

Cemu Wind Waker

(Last Updated On: July 13, 2017)

The Cemu emulator updates may have slowed down due to the fact that the Cemu Team has made the Wii U emulator about as good as most people could have hoped for, and with only some optimization and compatibility feats left, the community is focusing more on third-party support such as plugin loaders.

Over on the Cemu sub-Reddit, user Growlith1221 designed a new DLL plugin loader for the Cemu emulator. This allows users to load in custom third-party plugins and hook them into the Cemu easily without a lot of huffing, puffing or configuring going on.

Growlith1221 explains that the Cemu Plugin Loader doesn’t do anything special outside of loading in additional DLL files to make it easy to load up add-on packs, fixes, or other community-made updates. He does mention that eventually a GUI will be made available, writing…

“[…] right now, it’s working as a simple plugin loader, in the future(possibly in a few days actually), a gui will be available for various other things like choosing which dll(s) you want to load and whatnot”

You can download the Cemu Plugin Loader right now from the Dropbox download page.

It’s suggested that you don’t use the Cemuhook in conjunction with the Cemu Plugin Loader, so it’s something you definitely need to keep in mind.

Updates for the main emulator have slowed down quite a bit after the latest main release. For the most part, the big surge happened when the Cemu was just starting to emulate The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, but now that the game is mostly playable, it’s no longer a top priority for the community to express vested interests the way they did when the game first came out.

Nevertheless, Cemu is still a free Wii U emulator for PC, so you can download the latest version of from over on the official Cemu website.

Star Wars 8: Can you really buy an autographed Last Jedi script HERE? How is it possible?

Star Wars Last Jedi script for sale

Star Wars Last Jedi script for sale
Star Wars memorabilia is huge business, especially in the United STates.

A reconstituted R2-D2, constructed from original authentic parts used in the movies, recently sold for over $2million dollars.

A new listing has appeared on Movie Script Zone website which is bound to generate excitement and distrust in equal measure.

The site specialises in movie autographs and scripts and bears the logo of the Motion Picture Association of America – but how is it possible to already have an autographed Last Jedi script available, six months before the blockbuster is even released?

The listing states: “Star Wars EP9 : The Last Jedi Script Signed by 11.

“The Star Wars Last Jedi Script has been hand-signed by: Tom Hardy, Daisy Ridley, Domhnall Gleeson, Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Adam Driver, Benicio Del Toro, John Boyega, Andy Serkis, Peter Mayhew & Lupita Nyong’o.

“Our items are guaranteed 100% authentic. They have been thoroughly examined and will arrive accompanied with a Certificate of Authenticity and are backed by a lifetime guarantee.”

As well as being extraordinary, this would also be a huge scoop, since the vey first name mentioned, Tom Hardy, still has not been officially confirmed as a cast member.

For something so spectacularly desirable (and equally unlikely) the script is also a suspiciously bargain price of $299, reduced from $899. Postage outside the US costs an additional $25.

Surely an authentic script would go for considerably more than that? It would also have to be sold on the black market, since Disney and Lucasfilm are likely to sue any

The image shown seems to display eleven signatures, but it is impossible to verify if these are legitimate, fakes or good screenprints taken from other signed items.

Until someone actiaally buys the item and then reveals its contents it is impossible to know what the Force is on the pages of the alleged script.

[“Source-express”]

‘I never thought it would grow as quickly’: How one couple turned a six month caravan road trip into successful travel blogging careers thanks to stunning shots of Australia

At the start of 2016, Rachel Barwick and her partner Daniel travelled up the East Coast of Australia in a caravan, snapping photos for their friends and family along the way.

Fast-forward more than a year later and those photos have helped create blogging careers for the couple, who have nearly a million followers between them.

Rachel, 29, is now a full-time influencer, sharing gorgeous pictures from her and Daniel’s frequent adventures on her Instagram Life With Three.

At the start of 2016, Rachel Barwick and her partner Daniel travelled up the East Coast of Australia in a caravan, snapping photos for their friends and family along the way

At the start of 2016, Rachel Barwick and her partner Daniel travelled up the East Coast of Australia in a caravan, snapping photos for their friends and family along the way

Fast-forward more than a year later and those photos have helped create blogging careers for both Rachel and Daniel, who have nearly a million followers between them

Fast-forward more than a year later and those photos have helped create blogging careers for both Rachel and Daniel, who have nearly a million followers between them

Rachel, 29, is now a full-time influencer, sharing gorgeous pictures from her and Daniel's frequent adventures on her Instagram Life With Three

Rachel, 29, is now a full-time influencer, sharing gorgeous pictures from her and Daniel’s frequent adventures on her Instagram Life With Three

The account got its name from the fact that Rachel, who now lives in Adelaide, was travelling the country with Daniel and her dog Poppy.

When Rachel and Daniel first decided to set off on the major trip, she had no idea that pictures of their sights and experiences could turn into careers for both of them.

Rachel told Daily Mail Australia that the couple had just reached a point in their lives where they ‘really wanted to go out and explore as much of Australia as we could’.

The former teacher and her partner both wanted to show their family and friends what they were doing and ‘tell a bit of a story’ through their Instagram accounts.

But followers were quick to flock to their accounts, no doubt drawn to the numerous pictures of crystal blue waters and breathtaking sunrises.

When Rachel and Daniel first decided to set off on the major trip, she had no idea that pictures of their sights and experiences could turn into a career

When Rachel and Daniel first decided to set off on the major trip, she had no idea that pictures of their sights and experiences could turn into a career

Rachel told Daily Mail Australia that the couple had just reached a point in their lives where they 'really wanted to go out and explore as much of Australia as we could' 

Rachel told Daily Mail Australia that the couple had just reached a point in their lives where they ‘really wanted to go out and explore as much of Australia as we could’

The former teacher and her partner both wanted to show their family and friends what they were doing and 'tell a bit of a story' through their Instagram accounts

The former teacher and her partner both wanted to show their family and friends what they were doing and ‘tell a bit of a story’ through their Instagram accounts

‘I never thought it would grow as quickly as it did, which was fantastic,’ Rachel said.

‘We didn’t anticipate that it would, but it’s enjoyable to be able to share with other people.’

Rachel believes that one of the reasons people are so drawn to her Instagram is because she always tries to be ‘quite positive’ with her pictures and captions.

‘I think people connect with that,’ she said. ‘They feel they’re committing to something that helps them.’

Rachel has been blogging since the couple returned home, while Daniel works at a full-time job in the daytime.

They try to take a trip, even if its just interstate, once a month and bigger overseas trips every two months.

And the only factor that goes into deciding where they’re going to go is what they want to see next.

The couple usually take 'warm holidays' but recently visited the breathtaking sights in New Zealand for something different

The couple usually take ‘warm holidays’ but recently visited the breathtaking sights in New Zealand for something different

When the couple got to the Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, the recent snow had pushed all of the ice from the glacier right to the edge of the lake they visited

When the couple got to the Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, the recent snow had pushed all of the ice from the glacier right to the edge of the lake they visited

Rachel's dog Poppy is the third member of the family, and often features in pictures for her popular Instagram posts 

Rachel’s dog Poppy is the third member of the family, and often features in pictures for her popular Instagram posts

‘We usually try and pick warm holidays because I’m definitely a summer person,’ Rachel said with a laugh.

‘However, saying that, we have done two winter trips in the last few months!’

That included a trip to Milford Sound in the South Island of New Zealand, which Rachel said caught her completely by surprise.

‘It honestly felt like we were on another planet,’ she said.

‘I had seen pictures but I don’t think you fully respect the atmosphere and the nature of the place until you’re there.’

‘The cliffs are so high and tall and they’ve got these trees growing out of rocks because there’s no soil. It’s a very out of this world place.’

And when the couple got to the Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, the recent snow had pushed all of the ice from the glacier right to the edge of the lake they visited.

Rachel said she tries to photograph places that 'really show off' where the couple are, that gives her followers a sense of how they would see it if they were there

Rachel said she tries to photograph places that ‘really show off’ where the couple are, that gives her followers a sense of how they would see it if they were there

Rachel has been blogging since the couple have returned home, while Daniel also works at a full-time job in the daytime

Rachel has been blogging since the couple have returned home, while Daniel also works at a full-time job in the daytime

Rachel said the best part about her new career has been being able to share her story, as well as meet so many other like-minded people

Rachel said the best part about her new career has been being able to share her story, as well as meet so many other like-minded people

‘That felt surreal,’ she said. ‘It was a magical place.’

Rachel said she tries to photograph places that ‘really show off’ where the couple are and gives her followers a sense of how they would see it if they were there themselves.

‘I try to keep that aspirational part to it as well, and that positive mindset of travel and being in the moment,’ she said.

And although both she and Daniel are now travel bloggers, Rachel said there is no competition between them.

Rachel said the best part about her new career has been being able to share her story, as well as meet so many other like-minded people.

But Rachel does wish that more people realised how much work goes into travel blogging.

‘You do really put your heart and soul into the photos,’ she said. ‘It’s not just purely putting up a simple photo.’

Rachel said one photo can take hours of work depending on the location, whether the couple are travelling, and how much editing it needs before it can go up.

Rachel believes that one of the reasons people are so drawn to her Instagram is because she always tries to be 'quite positive' with her pictures and captions

Rachel believes that one of the reasons people are so drawn to her Instagram is because she always tries to be ‘quite positive’ with her pictures and captions

Rachel said the couple try to take at least one small trip a month, even if its just interstate, and go overseas every two months

Rachel said the couple try to take at least one small trip a month, even if its just interstate, and go overseas every two months

‘I think people underestimate the amount of work that people put into their photos,’ she added.

Rachel calls Byron Bay her favourite place in the world, but it was a hot ballooning experience with Daniel and their mums over Mareeba that she’ll never forget.

‘We actually had our mums fly out for a week of adventure, and we surprised them with this hot air balloon,’ she said.

‘We went up on sunrise, and it was such a beautiful experience because I had never been before, and it’s so surreal.’

‘You’re just floating, there’s no noise, and you’re just gliding in the world.’

A picture can say a thousands words, but some of the most unforgettable experiences can’t be captured in a photo.

[“Source-dailymail”]

How to Make Your 4K Footage Look Like It Was Shot in the 90s

Image result for How to Make Your 4K Footage Look Like It Was Shot in the 90sSo many photographers have recently been dipping their toes in the world of video. You can edit photos like a pro, but maybe you just can’t seem to figure out video editing; it’s very complex – like an onion, so many layers – and now you have to deal with sound design! If you’ve used presets for your photo editing, then you should definitely consider plugins for your video editing. Red Giant sent us a copy of their recently updated Universe 2.1. Jump on in and see what it’s all about.

I’ve always been a fan of Red Giant ever since I learned the Pen Tool in AfterEffects using Trapcode Suite. Later, in my first “real” job, we relied heavily on Magic Bullet, specifically Looks. So, when they sent us a copy, I was super excited to try out Universe 2.1. I only used a few plugins for this video, but it’s ridiculous how many more there are.

There are six new tools and two updates to the suite:

  • AV Club: Mimic the lo-fi, noisy text you find on ancient video tapes, old infomercials, and local access cable channel shows.
  • Luster: Give your text a slick 1980s retro look. Luster applies a metal sheen to text and includes a refraction-based bevel for a glassy simulated 3D look.
  • Title Motion: Create text and shapes and then instantly add dynamic animations that bring them on and off screen. It’s great for titles, lower thirds, callouts, and more.
  • Ecto: Create haunting, evolving titles with this glowing fractal-based effect, inspired by “Ghostbusters” and “Stranger Things.”
  • Long Shadow: Apply a colored, long shadow to text, logo, or shape, for both classic and modern motion design.
  • Glo Fi II: Give text an ethereal, moody look by instantly adding silky smooth, self-animating, fractal-based glow effects to titles. A simple UI makes it easy to apply evolving, organic glows.
  • Line: This update adds the ability to add text at the start and endpoint of a line.
  • Holomatrix II: This update includes blurred, chromatic distortions, a new strobe effect, and much more.

Holomatrix II is so much fun! While I was testing it out, Patrick suggested I drop the hologram of Tupac in the background, but we figured that would be infringing on copyright, so we went with Princess Leia instead. Not only is this plugin fun, it’s so, so easy. They give you 85 presets to choose from within the plugin (just inside of the Holomatrix II tool), or you can set the parameters yourself and control anything you want. So, I started with their default preset and was able to choose how much distortion, speed, flicker; again, you have total control.

It’s one of the reasons I love plugins: they help you save so much time when it comes to editing, and they also teach you more about the program. I taught myself AfterEffects watching YouTube tutorials and breaking down plugins, seeing what each effect did. When it comes to the type of videos most of us are going to edit, you really shouldn’t be afraid of trying basic AfterEffects!

For the ridiculous 90s montage Lee filmed, I used the VHS plugin, which again, I can’t reiterate how easy it was to use. While all of this editing was done inside Premiere Pro, Universe 2.1 can be used in most NLE programs as well, such as Final Cut X, but be sure to check out Red Giant’s Compatibility Page if you’re using a different program.

Filming and editing this video was so much fun. I was able to play around with a lot of their plugins, and you should too! Another thing to keep in mind when it comes to using these plugins: they will save you time in editing, but might add time when it comes to exporting.

Universe 2.1 is really affordable too if you’re someone who uses plugins for your work. They have a monthly subscription for $20 or a yearly for $99.

All in all, I really enjoyed messing around with these different plugins. I am going to try to work on some more videos to show you even more of the plugins. Also, let me know in the comments below if you would want a mini tutorial on how to use any specific plugin! If you’ve never tried Red Giant Plugins, at least give the free trial a go! I think you’ll be glad you did.

[“Source-ndtv”]

2017’s SEO Job Trends: What Does it Mean for Your SEO Career? [DATA]

2017’s SEO Job Trends: What Does it Mean for Your SEO Career? [DATA]

As we enter 2017, it’s natural to reflect on the past year and make predictions on what’s to come. As such, here are some interesting data points from nine months of research on SEO job market trends, as well as suggestions how each one may impact your career.

I don’t want to lull you to sleep with all of the methodology, but it’s important to know what data I’ve been pulling:

  • SEO Title Openings – # of full-time job openings in Indeed.com within 50 miles from the nearest location* with “SEO” in the title
  • SEO Skill Openings – # of full-time job openings in Indeed.com within 50 miles from the nearest location* with “SEO” anywhere in the job posting (title or description)
  • SEO Workforce – # of LinkedIn profiles within 50 miles from the nearest location* with “SEO” in their current job title

*Location – I looked at the top 75 most populous CSAs (Combined Statistical Area) or MSAs (Metropolitan Statistical Area). You can learn more about what these are and why I chose them over just using cities here on my personal blog. For simplicity’s sake, I’ll just refer to the biggest city in area.

1. If SEO is dead, its job market hasn’t got the memo.

The overall job market has been good, but SEO has been growing over 5X faster

"SEO is dead" - some guy named Steve, probably

The total job market has grown by 0.3% from August through December, while SEO has surged by a whopping 2.0% in that time span!

Cities pulling more than their weight

Top 5 Cities in SEO Title Opening Total Growth (Aug-Jan)

Top 5 USA cities in SEO job growth: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Austin, Philadelphia & Miami

Top 5 Cities in SEO Title Opening Percentage Growth (Aug-Jan)

Top 5 cities in SEO job growth by percentage: Omaha, Tulsa, New Orleans, Columbia (SC), McAllen

SEO Title Opening Growth (Aug-Jan) by Region

SEO job growth by region: West, Midwest, South, Northeast

What it could mean for your career

OK, this one’s probably obvious but don’t switch careers!

We often hear things like “SEO is dead” and “content marketing is the new SEO”, but it’s important to understand SEO remains the dominant title preference on an upward swing. And I know, yesterday’s words don’t make themselves heard and the past doesn’t always predict the future, but these trends look promising.

2. It’s not all up and to the right. SEO openings are trending downward.

Despite its growth in employment, SEO positions aren’t opening at the same rate.

Indeed listings with “SEO” in the title are down 13.2%% since May with a Pearson correlation of -0.8244 when compared to SEO workforce growth in LinkedIn.

SEO workforce to openings trended over time

At face value, there appears to be a couple “no duhs” with this finding.

  1. Of course there’s a strong negative correlation between job openings and closings. However, that’s assuming you’re working with a finite amount of job openings, which is far from the case.
  2. Couldn’t this be due to seasonality? Everyone knows the job market can tighten up towards the end of the year as budgets run low and uncertainties of next year loom. However, Indeed tells us total job postings in our broader industry have only declined by 6.1% in that timeframe, just half the rate of SEO.

So seasonality appears to be a main factor, but certainly not the only one. Another potential contributor could be SEO jobs are slowly being called something else. We’ll get into this a little more in the next point, but while SEO Title Openings decreased by 13.2%% since May, SEO Skill Postings (“SEO” anywhere in the job posting) only fell by 10.3%.

It’s also important to note that LinkedIn and Indeed use entirely different data sets. If Indeed is declining in popularity, which doesn’t appear to be the case, it could inflate the perceived decline.

What it could mean for your career

If you’re looking elsewhere to let your SEO skills shine, consider the time of year when making your move. Indeed says job seeker interest is typically lower in the first half of the year, which according to the data I’ve pulled, may be when the job postings are cyclically high. On a side note, Team – if you’re reading this, please know that national trends may not reflect what’s going on in Kansas City. Please stay. We have a good thing going right now. Let’s keep it that way.

3. SEO jobs are slowly being named something else. And the key word is ‘slowly’.

The ratio of SEO as a job to SEO as a skill has only declined 3.2% since May

There’s been legitimate acknowledgement of SEO becoming less of a job title and more of a skill within a role of broader scope. While I agree this seems to be the trend, it appears it is heavily slowing in the past 6 months. Take a look at the graph below. The coasts appear to have already leveled out from this trend with the South and Midwest regions basically caught up.

ratio of SEO title to SEO skill openings trended over time

Here’s the same graph with the middle months removed to more easily see the contrast:

ratio of SEO title to SEO skill openings in August 2016 and January 2017

What it could mean for your career

The “SEO” job isn’t going anywhere. If you’re a job seeker, it’s perfectly fine to assume a title with SEO in it. And if you’re an employer, don’t feel like you need to switch out “SEO” with the latest buzzword alternative.

To be clear, I don’t mean to use “buzzword” with a negative connotation. ‘Content marketing’, ‘inbound marketing’, ‘growth hacking’ and ‘website optimization’ can all describe different job roles, but two things are clear about each of them: they’re on the rise, and their duties often overlap with traditional SEO.

While these other names are in fact trending up, it may be too early to predict their staying power, at least relative to how SEO has fared over the past decade.

4. The best city in America to get an SEO job right now is Phoenix

When weighing SEO’s job availability to its interest, no city has looked better over the past 6 months than Phoenix.

Using a method called feature scaling, I developed a formula to compare SEO job supply vs. demand to rank the best cities in America to get an SEO job, one through seventy-five. You can read them all on my latest post that was linked in the beginning, but here are the top five.

Best Cities in the US to Get an SEO Job

Top 5 cities in America to get an SEO job

What it could mean for your career

No, I’m not telling you to move to Arizona. Relative to many other fields, the SEO job market is favorable in most places. Also, with technology paving the way for more telecommuting roles, you can practice SEO from basically anywhere in the world.

What I am recommending is if you’re thinking of relocating, don’t just evaluate the job and the pros and cons of living in the new city. You should also consider the SEO job market as much as you can. If it doesn’t work, how easy will it be to get a similar position nearby? Of course, you can always increase your odds by building strong networking relationships and continuing to deepen and broaden your skillset.

Here’s to a great SEO career for you in 2017!

two people toasting beers

Image Credits:

Image courtesy of Unsplash (Pixabay, edited via PAINT.net)
Image courtesy of geralt (Pixabay, edited via PAINT.net)
All other images from Tylor Hermanson and SandboxSEO.com

[Source:-SEJ]

SEO in the IT Company C-Suite

Internet Marketing has been a big deal for a long time now; it’s definitely mainstream marketing at this point. But Internet Marketing means different things to different people—Social media marketing, banner advertising, pay-per-click ads, email newsletters, email direct marketing, affiliate marketing, electronic press releases, etc. Any and all of these may be an important part of your optimal online marketing mix, depending upon the specifics of your business and resources. However, there is one online marketing method that nearly EVERYONE should be pursuing. Yet even today in 2017, I find that too many technology companies–yes, even technology companies — are not effectively utilizing this marketing method and it’s very surprising to me. I’m referring to Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

Many IT industry CXOs have no clue about SEO

SEO is the practice of modifying the content and infrastructure of your website, as well as obtaining incoming links to ensure that the Search Engines find it when someone enters a keyword search that is highly relevant to your site. This just doesn’t happen automatically—unfortunately. The biggest problem I find is the lack of understanding of the importance of this marketing method in the executive suite of tech companies – especially when the inhabitants of the executive suite came up through the ranks prior to digital marketing becoming the mainstream method. When the executive suite doesn’t understand or value an activity, it is very easy for resource allocation and ultimately results to be sub-optimal.

Offline Marketing Analogies to SEO

Even if you aren’t yet a digital marketing expert, most senior executives are familiar with the now old offline world with the use of press releases and magazine advertising as “staples” of marketing. Of the two, Press Releases are the “free” and more credible method of publicizing your products or services. There is no guarantee that a press release or a story derived from it will actually be published, but if it is published, the credibility is very high with the reader—and of course the expense may have been very low to garner this fantastic exposure. Magazine advertising on the other hand is guaranteed to give you exposure, but is much more expensive and somewhat less credible with the reader than PR written on the same topic.

I like to use an analogy from offline marketing to explain the importance and relative position that SEO should take in your marketing mix. In the online world, you can think of SEO as the PR of the Internet while Pay-per-Click (PPC) advertising such as Google Adwords is analogous to the magazine advertising that appeared in the old offline media. SEO-driven results appears in the “Organic” listing when doing a search in an engine like Google or Bing and as a result it is considered highly credible. Tremendous amounts of targeted potential customers can be driven to your site via Search Engines Organic results at “no” direct cost. It’s also important to remember that this doesn’t happen in a vacuum, it is a competitive issue as well. I guarantee that your savvy competitors are investing heavily in this area.

As long as I’m using analogies, here’s another way of looking at this topic: Would you spend huge amounts of money to build a beautiful retail store, then put it out in the middle of a cornfield, 50 miles from the nearest consumer – and not even listed on a map? I hope that any business person reading this would answer “No”. Even if you advertised heavily to drive traffic to this store, generally it would make little sense. Yet, even today I still find many senior executives in High Tech companies are oblivious, or at least don’t sufficiently understand the strategic importance of having a website highly optimized for Search—which is the Internet equivalent to “Location, Location, Location” in the retail business world. Many executives however will spend a lot of time and money on creating websites which are built by Graphics Designers who put great effort into the “look and feel” and “branding” of the site (the beautiful retail store)—and literally NO effort into enabling someone to find the site through search engines (building it in a cornfield). In fact, excessive website “design” can significantly slow the loading of a website – which negatively affects the site’s SEO.

In search engine land, the key is to appear among the first six sites (“above the fold”) on the first page in the results of a search. This can lead to enormous increases in traffic to your site for certain keywords. For searches containing the important keywords specific to your business, getting your site to appear in the top six sites of the results should be your goal. If you are able to accomplish this the visibility among your target customer will increase substantially—possibly exponentially. If your competitors are and you are not–you lose.

I don’t want to pretend that maximizing your results is easy. But at least the initial steps that you should take are not that hard. I believe that this important topic doesn’t get the play it should in executive suites because of a “fear factor.” SEO in many circles is viewed as a highly technical field, understandable only to “geeks.” A lot of times, people just don’t know where to start. But once you delve into it, most of the steps are pretty straightforward.

So what are the specifics on how should you go about enhancing SEO on your website? Do it internally, hire outside experts, etc? Just like most other things in technology marketing, it depends upon the skills within your company, the competitiveness of your marketplace, and the company’s financial resources.

Search Engine Optimization – It’s Important

To return to our examples from the offline marketing world, remember that how companies conduct their press relations varies widely. Companies with large financial resources, as well as those in fast-moving & competitive markets often hire external PR firms to spearhead their campaigns, with retainers of $10-15K/month or more. For these companies, having outside experts focus on this important activity is viewed as critical and isn’t given a second thought at budget time. Other companies feel more comfortable hiring an in-house PR person, both from a productivity and budget perspective. And smaller companies can’t hire PR expertise at all—but they know they need press coverage, so they still find a way to write press releases and promote them on their own to the important editors in their vertical market. Because they realize that it’s IMPORTANT.

Recommended for YouWebcast, February 16th: Build Your Growth Roadmap in a Day

Your methodology for attacking SEO should be considered exactly the same way. If you are in a highly competitive market and are flush with money, it may make sense to hire one of the hundreds of agencies focused specifically on search engine marketing to optimize your site. Or you may have a webmaster or marketer in-house that has the skills and interest to take on the task. But even if you have no in-house expertise and can’t afford to hire anyone—by all means, do it yourself. Buy an SEO book or one of the modestly priced SEO analytics software packages available to walk you through it. Do it because it’s IMPORTANT.

What NOT to do in Search Engine Optimization

The one thing I DON’T recommend is to just “throw money at it” and walk away. SEO is an on-going, critical activity that needs to be managed for the long haul. It is important that someone at a senior level in-house gain enough knowledge about what is important to be able to monitor it from a management perspective. Otherwise, you risk really going off the rails, regardless how you decide to handle the implementation. In particular, there is a tendency to simply “outsource” activities that management doesn’t understand or isn’t comfortable with. The problem is that there are a number of “quick fix” artists in digital marketing (especially the SEO-focused agencies), who claim to bring you a lot of traffic fast. They use questionable practices (known as “Black Hat”) that can get you in serious trouble with the Search Engines which in the long run have the opposite effect from what you are seeking. If you don’t have a senior manager that understands the implications of what’s being done to your website, you can get burned badly.

SEO Recommendations for the Tech CEO

So let’s say that you’re a CEO or other CXO and you’ve decided to “do it yourself”, or at least have decided you need to get a basic understanding of the SEO process. Where do you start?

Here’s what I recommend:

  • Start BEFORE you put up your initial or refreshed website if at all possible–SEO starts with good infrastructure, so that the Search Engines can efficiently find and crawl your great content. If you wait until after your site is up, you’re already behind the 8-ball. It’s much easier to do it right from the beginning
  • Buy and read a popular Search Engine Optimization or Search Engine Marketing book, or take an overview class to become conversant
  • Purchase one of the Search Engine Optimization Software Packages which are available for a few hundred dollars
  • Hire a digital marketing or “White Hat” SEO consultant to advise you

Once you’ve become familiar, here are the important basic steps that you’ll want to make sure that you understand:

  1. Select keywords to optimize you site for — ones that are important to your potential clients and your business. Look at your own website and other marketing materials, look at your competitor’s sites and use tools like the Google Adwords Keyword tools. This is a critical part of the process—you need to select keywords that are both relevant to your business and not so competitive that you are still able to “own them”—in other words, appear in the top 6 listings when they are searched.
  2. Make sure that your Page titles and Page URLs are rich with the selected keywords. This is very important, and is why new websites should be optimized for search when they are initially built (which usually doesn’t’ happen, unfortunately).
  3. Include keyword-rich “anchor link text” in your content (although don’t overdue this), and make sure to label all images with keyword-rich text.
  4. Make your main body text keyword rich—and probably more text intensive than your graphics designers would like. Even though the designers (and senior executives) may think its ugly, search engines love—and only understand (image search notwithstanding)—text. Some engines will even completely ignore pages with less than 300 words. If your pages appear too “clean and pretty”, there’s a good chance they will be ignored by the search engine bots when they do their indexing, because the search engine is trying to present the most “informative” page and yours is perceived as lacking information. So you need to make some compromises between SEO and look and feel.
  5. Start a “never-ending” campaign to get external websites to create links into your site. This is also critical, because search engines use this is a measure of how “important” your site is relative to your competitors. The more relevant and popular the linking site is, the better. Social Media is a great place these days to place articles, drive traffic and get relevant links. But make sure you don’t use “Black Hat” methods here (such as buying links) as these can get you completely banned in the search results.

SEO is actually a very complex field with lots of important but mundane technical details. Much more must be done past the basic process I’ve outlined above to optimize your site. But these are the basics, a good starting point—if you run through this process as a senior manager you will be much better prepared to buy external SEO implementation or advisory services or hire experts for your internal staff.

As a C-level manager you wouldn’t feel comfortable being ignorant as to how the PR process works, would you? In the Internet age neither can a Software or Hardware CEO or other CxO afford to be ignorant about SEO! Leave a comment with your own thoughts or best practices.

[Source:-B2C]

SEO How-to, Part 1: Why Do You Need It?

Editor’s note: This post begins a weekly primer in SEO, with the goal of touching on all of the foundational aspects. At the end, you’ll be able to practice SEO more confidently and converse with others regarding important SEO challenges and opportunities.

Search engine optimization is part science and part art. But the foundational principles of SEO are straightforward. Still, before I can address how to practice SEO, I should explain what it is and why it’s important.

Google alone controls access to trillions of annual requests for information. Google, Yahoo, and Bing remain three of the U.S.’s top four trafficked websites, according to comScore, the research firm. Presence in search results is critical to generating brand awareness and preference. With an estimated $80 billion spent online in the 2016 holiday season alone, and the increasingly “micro-moment,” quick-search mentality of mobile consumers, SEO is more important than ever to driving shoppers to your site and away from the competition.

SEO is simply the practice of optimizing your search-engine presence to produce traffic and to your site. It is also called organic search or natural search. SEO should thread through every aspect of an organization — from product planning, traditional marketing, and customer support to the more obvious areas of digital planning, strategy, content, user experience, design, development, and deployment.

Search engines do not charge advertising fees for natural search results.

Visually, natural search results are always toward the top of the page at the left side. Depending on the search engine and the query, there will probably be ads above the natural listings, as shown below.

Google’s U.S. search results page for the query “canoe paddles.”

Google’s U.S. search results page for the query “canoe paddles.”

With all of the other boxes and components on the search results page, it is increasingly difficult to claim a visible spot in the first view. Google frequently places a Product Listing Ads box and up to four other ads above the first natural search listing, resulting in only one or two visible natural search listings when the page loads.

Regardless, natural search remains one of the top-performing digital marketing channels for most ecommerce businesses. Some studies put the average traffic driven by natural search at around 50 percent of the total, and average revenue driven at about 40 percent. But in my experience, it varies widely based on the size of the business, and the maturity and spend of their marketing mix.

The more balanced the marketing spend is for the various channels — such as social, email, video, display ads — the lower natural search performance will be as a percentage of the whole, especially as the other channels mature and perform.

I’ve seen businesses that drove 75 percent of their traffic and sales via natural search. This level of dependence on SEO is dangerous because a single algorithm update or SEO-impacting technical glitch could decimate your revenue stream. However, even a business with a mature marketing mix and a site truly search-engine optimized should drive 15 to 25 percent of its traffic and revenue via natural search.

Fortunately, SEO is also one of the least expensive marketing channels in terms of direct and recurring spend. Advertising stops sending referrals when you turn it off. But SEO involves enhancements, which should also be transparent to or beneficial to your shoppers, that improve the site’s ability to drive shoppers from natural search from that time forward. Consequently, while not free as many claim, SEO’s cost is rooted in the time it takes to plan and execute the improvements to your site.

Seemingly every couple of months someone will claim that SEO is dead. That’s certainly true with individual tactics that seek to gain a faster advantage in search results — essentially sneaky tricks or cheating. For example, the very old practice of hiding white text on a page with a white background has long been stamped out. Likewise posting volumes of low-value “articles” or “press releases” filled with over-optimized links to your site in repositories for other sites to use as free content no longer has any SEO value.

However, ethical SEO isn’t about tricks, short-term gains, and taking risks. Ethical SEO is what marketing has become: creating compelling content that shoppers value so much that they share and link to it. When combined with the technical and architectural components of designing and developing a site that is optimal for natural search, ethical SEO is an ever-changing discipline that will only die when consumers stop searching.

[Source:-Practical Ecommerce]

Seo-jung held hostage, Do-geum runs for it

“Running Man,” a popular entertainment show on KBFD, will come to an end in the spring of next year after six years and seven months.

The producers had planned to change out two stars, Jong Kook Kim and Ji Hyo Song, and replace with Ho Dong Kang to co-host the show. But producers failed to let Song and Kim know of the planned change before the media announcements, which resulted in complaints. Kang then decided not to join the show as a result of the situation.

As a result, the network decided to cancel the show. The replacement program as also not been announced as of yet.

“Running Man” airs on KBFD on Saturday afternoons at 2 p.m.

For those of you planning to travel to South Korea, the weather is in the 20s to the 40s Fahrenheit and progressively getting colder as January is one of the coldest winter season. Merry Christmas.

Upcoming episodes:

‘Perfect Bride’

Episodes 15 & 16

Today, 6:30 p.m.: Upset at their father, Cho-rong and Da-rong go to the police station. Ki-ja makes it to the police station and learns that Jae-soon is Gab-soon’s sister. Gab-dol confirms his suspicion for Ha-soo, then starts to stalk him and Gab-soon.

Today, 7:45 p.m.: Jae-soon anxiously sees Geum-shik’s meetings with Da-hae increase. She brings up registering Ddol on Geum-shik’s family register. Unable to pay the rent, Do-geum makes a run for it in the middle of the night. He is invited to Shi-nae’s house where Ki-ja works as the help.

‘Dr. Romantic’

Episodes 7 & 8

Monday, 7:45 p.m.: Hyun-chul assigns Gi-tae as the acting director to find dirt on Doldam Hospital and Teacher Kim. Dong-joo and In-bum run into each other at Doldam Hospital, and their meeting ends with In-bum punching Dong-joo.

Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.: A man holds Seo-jung hostage with a sickle at her throat, shouting at the doctors to stop the surgery. Teacher Kim refuses to stop, disregarding the man’s threat. Nurse Ji keeps a thorough record of all events at the hospital, and in the process, learns that Seo-jung has a post-traumatic stress disorder.

‘Happy Home’

Episode 16 & 17

Friday, 7:45 p.m.: Ji-gun tells Hae-ryung he’s sorry that he loves her. Gyeong-ok blames Hae-ryung’s crass behavior for all the problems. Hae-ryung tells Kyong-ok that she can’t do anything when she leaves.

Saturday, 7:45 p.m.: When Gyeong-ok accuses Hae-ryung of crassness, Hyun-ki declares he’ll live with Hae-ryung. Hae-ryung tells Hae-won she’s left home and will divorce. Hae-ryung and Ji-gun become closer.

‘Legend of the Blue Sea’

Episodes 7 & 8

Wednesday, 7:45 p.m.: Having lost his memory of his time with Shim Chung in Spain, Joon-jae is bothered by her mention of the other man. Detective Hong runs into Ma Dae-young while searching for evidence of the loan shark murder.

Thursday, 7:45 p.m.: Shim Chung throws Joon-jae a curveball of a question, making him serious and sincere. Joon-jae thinks it’s strange that Mr. Nam has become unreachable and tries calling him again. To his surprise, Ma Dae-young answers Mr. Nam’s phone.

•••

Jeff Chung is general manager of KBFD TV, which televises Korean dramas. This column offers synopses of the dramas playing in Hawaii. Chung can be reached at 521-8066 or [email protected]

[SOURCE:-TGI]

Google Maps update removes one feature, replaces it with two brilliant new ones

Google Maps just rolled out a new update to its iPhone app

Google Maps has been updated on iOS.

Interestingly, the new software removes the Travel Times and Transit widgets Google added to Google Maps last month.

Google has not given a reason for the removal, but has instead replaced the iOS 10 widget with a new alternatives in the latest update, which brings the app to version 4.25.0.

The brand-new iOS 10 widget brings traffic time for your location.

The widget, which can be accessed by either swiping left on the Lock Screen or the Home Page of your iOS 10 device, displays a small map showing traffic congestion close to your current location.

The Google Maps widget displays a brief summary of traffic at your locationEXPRESS NEWSPAPERS

The Google Maps widget displays a brief summary of traffic at your location

Tapping the Show More button launches a more detailed map, with wider reaching traffic dataEXPRESS NEWSPAPERS

Tapping the Show More button launches a more detailed map, with wider reaching traffic data

Additionally, the widget offers up a short description of the conditions, something like “Light traffic in your area. Faster than usual.”

It’s a handy way to check the state of the road in your location without the need to login to your Apple device and launch the Google Maps app.

Secondly, the new Google Maps update also brings the ability to search for places along a route while you are already using the turn-by-turn navigation feature.

Back in August, iPhone users were finally given the ability to add multiple stops when planning a single trip on Google Maps.

This feature has long been available on the web version of Google Maps, first introduced in 2015, but has taken an inordinate amount of time to make the jump to mobile, where it debuted on Android devices earlier this year.

In the latest version of Google Maps, it is possible to add more stops from the navigation display.

Simply tap the Search icon and then pick from a list of categories, including Gas Stations, Restaurants – or search for a specific place by name.

Results will be plotted along your current route, where they can then be added to the ongoing turn-by-turn navigation.

[sOURCE:-Express]

Megan Vaughan: Has theatre blogging really changed? Or is it just us?

Ferdy Roberts, Lasse Myhr, Nicolas Tennant and Sergo Vares in Simon Stephens’ Three Kingdoms at the Lyric Hammersmith in 2012

So, Matt Trueman is worried about the decline of theatre blogs. Fair enough I suppose; we all worry about something. In my case it has mainly been funding deadlines and Aleppo, but since Thursday morning I’ve also had to face the fact that my peers and I are disappointing Trueman. And there I was thinking 2016 couldn’t get any worse.

Trueman’s piece warrants a response, not because he’s wrong, but because of the arrogance of his position. It seems he’s suffering the combination of selective memory and blind privilege that I affectionately refer to as Old Bastard Syndrome.

Old Bastard Syndrome [noun]: a collection of symptoms afflicting the naive and/or the jaded, combining to make sufferers believe that “things were better in their day”, often combined with false accusations re the root of their ills. (See also: Brexit.)

Those wonderful days when the internet was full of lazy hate speech

Let’s go back in time a bit, to 2012, and the UK premier of Three Kingdoms at the Lyric Hammersmith. According to Trueman’s article, the halcyon days of theatre blogging are epitomised by the debate around this show, as we waged “guerrilla warfare… [in] a full-blown stand-off, as bloggers and critics stared each other down over a stage full of sex toys and animal heads”. Oh, those wonderful days where everyone despised each other and the internet was still full of lazy, unnuanced hate speech from professional critics about bloggers, or from bloggers about professional critics. Yeah. “Bring back National Service.” “Hanging’s too good for ‘em.” FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT.

But that’s not how I remember 2012. By that time in my blogging career I’d been a theatre criticism nerd for several years already. Along with Trueman, Andrew Haydon, Daniel B Yates, Catherine Love, Sarah Punshon, Maddy Costa and several others, I read about Three Kingdoms, blogged about Three Kingdoms, talked for hours about Three Kingdoms. I agree it was a time of headstrong debate and passionate feeling about the way that critics responded to something so new and unapologetic. But I’m not sure I see how our writings from that time were too far removed from the plethora of review blogs that even Trueman acknowledges we have today. The 2012 crew weren’t different or special. Writing online, we were able to give the required space and words to our arguments, but the majority of these posts were, pure and simple, reviews of the show. And that tradition continues today.

In 2012, we had Love discussing misogyny in Three Kingdoms; today we have Rosie Curtis exploring her complex personal feelings about feminist solidarity with Emma Rice and Bryony Kimmings. In 2012, Trueman was discussing German theatrical excess in a British context; today, Ian Foster questions the conservatism of all-white casts. In 2012, I was running bad jokes through Google Translate; today, James Varney plays with the conventions of spelling to discuss the American archetype in Sweet Charity.

Laura Kressly, blogger and co-founder of the Network of Independent Critics, is positive about the current blogging community too. She says:

I recently discovered an army of very young bloggers out there, some of whom are still in uni, or school. Seriously. Look up @ohmymusicals [Em Jenkins] – she’s 17. They are out there and they aren’t hard to find, and they are talking to each other. A lot. It’s beautiful. I’d suggest to Trueman he start with his Twitter followers.

So what’s Trueman’s problem? Why does he feel like something’s disappeared? Can he really just be pining for a time when we all fought more? I wanted to ask the other bloggers than he mentioned, to see how they felt about his comments. Here’s Love:

I wonder if part of it is just to do with a sense of community dissipating… Because for a while, it really felt as though there was an oppositional critical dialogue going on which was really exciting, at least for those of us who were part of it, and that’s perhaps less visible now.

Haydon told me something similar, putting those conversations into the context of newspaper criticism at that time. He specifically remembered Nicholas Hytner’s famous dismissal of the “dead white males” who then occupied most of the lead critic positions:

I think that’s likely to be an unrepeatable moment. The conditions of the time (the arrival of the technology, the extremity of the calcification of the ‘dead white males’) can’t ever really be repeated. Apart from anything else, it would take at least 20 years to make today’s ‘old guard’ seem as monolithic as the 2007 lot.

So… have we… have we… won?

The answer, of course, is no. But the battleground has changed. As a new generation of voices stakes their claim to dwindling space in mainstream publications, and the 2012 cohort of bloggers focus on different opportunities and career paths, the question of criticism’s financial sustainability permeates both sides of the trenches. Freelance rates are down, sponsorship of reviews is ethically questionable, and crowdfunding is burdensome. My own output in 2016 has been affected by a combination of things: a successful crowdfunder increased my sense of obligation, then a new job brought unforeseen conflicts of interest; together they led to simple, old-fashioned burnout. The free labour involved in blogging extends beyond the writing; just managing the time commitment can be an emotional ordeal.

Kressly is typical of the average theatre blogger:

I work two part-time jobs spread over six days, plus the odd bit of small-scale producing, plus reviewing 3-4 shows a week. My socialising is mostly limited to friends taking my plus ones. I get more review invites than I can accept, even with a collection of people who occasionally guest review. Also, I’m at that age (I’m 35 next year – 35 – fuck) where my partner and I want to start a family and need to get on with things rather than putting it off for much longer. So I’m not sure what else Trueman wants from us. Sure, I’d love to write a reasoned, articulate response to his article but I won’t have time until at least Sunday.

That Trueman glosses over these issues is a marker of his own success. Despite what his official biog on The Stage still claims, Trueman is no longer a blogger. He quietly gave it up, years ago. In many ways, I’m happy for him. He’s one of the best critics we have. But Haydon likened his argument about blogs to “sitting about in Russia in 1926 and worrying that the Revolution just doesn’t feel as Revolution-y anymore”. Costa said it was “the most Billington thing he’s done in ages”, which says a lot. I reckon it’s a bit like he’s been choppered to safety, then turned back to bitch at those left on the life raft for not paddling properly.

Thing is, I bet if you spoke to the mainstream critics that we were once kicking against, most of them would raise a groomed eyebrow, take a slow swig of cognac, and say “Oh really, darling? That was a ‘beef’, was it? How exciting.” Those arguments and conversations felt like everything to me five years ago, but did they really register with critics and editors? I hope we helped to invigorate and encourage online conversation about theatre, and the new writers arriving to have those conversations, but that many of the ‘dead white males’ have since retired is no great victory, just the passing of time.

Perhaps Trueman’s insistence that theatre blogging is dying is simply evidence that the further his career goes, the more distant from it he becomes. After all, Old Bastard Syndrome can develop long before it is detected. We can only hope that this contribution to the debate is antagonistic enough to shake him out of it.

[Source:-The Stage]