10 things learnt from 10 years of blogging

10 things learnt from 10 years of blogging

Image via Shutterstock

For the past 10 years I have been writing a blog about Melbourne’s visual arts. My first blog post on Black Mark, Melbourne Art and Culture Critic was on February 16, 2008. It was ‘Faster Faster Pussycat’ about Phibs, Debs and other street artists painting a wall in Fitzroy. Now over a 1000 blog posts later this is what I have I learned about blogging.

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    1. It can motivate you The first thing I learned was that writing a blog was motivation to do more in life; I was already going to many art exhibitions but now there was more motivation to go to places, meet people and do other fun things. Soon I started to get invitations to do more things and meet more people. Blogging changed my life; although it wasn’t actually the writing, nor the taking endless photos, or the posting online that really made the change.
    2. You probably won’t make money Do not expect to make money from advertising on your blog but there are a variety of other ways that you can use a blog professionally from promotion to networking. My friend Professor Alison Young, who I met through blogging, uses her blog Images to Live By, to introduce herself. Middle-aged academics are not a typical part of the street art/graffiti scene but now Alison is ‘Banksy favourite criminologist’.
    3. You can make friends I have made many new friends through writing the blog, which has improved the quality of my life. One reason why I have made so many friends blogging is that I mostly write about what other people are doing.
    4. You learn how to manage enemies I have learned how to deal with hostile comments, trolls and other idiots. You can’t predict what will get people to write hostile comments – it could be pigeons in Coburg. I have never shied away from controversy, writing posts about the persecution of Bill Henson and Paul Yore. When I have hostile comments I always remember that the person writing them will forget about it after a day or two. If they don’t, that I can always block them from making comments, but I’ve only had to do this once in ten years. Comments are not indicative of anything; no comment does not mean a bad post. Out of 1,077 post I have only had 2,099 comments; half the comments are my own because I generally reply to all comments but I avoid feeding trolls.
    5. You need a focus My blog is focused on Melbourne’s visual arts but I do post about other things on it. Having a clear focus for a blog is important but it is a balance between a very narrow focus and ranging too far. With 13 categories on my blog I’m not sure that I’ve got it right but it is a lesson I’ve learned.
    6. You get to do a lot of people watching Vox pops can make a good local blog post. These don’t have to be direct quotes, but observations on how people are reacting. I like to watch how small children react at art exhibitions; are they engaged or bored? ‘Why does a tree need a sweater?’ is an example of how one observation of an angry man made a successful blog post about yarn bombing.Another local blogger and people-watcher is the writer Jane Routley, who writes about her day job in Station Stories, life as a Station Assistant.
    7. You might get a book published In 2015 my first book, Sculpture of Melbourne, was published by Melbourne Books. I started writing and researching the book on my blog and before I started my blog I couldn’t have imagined writing a history of Melbourne’s public sculpture. I am now working on my second book about true art crimes in Melbourne.
    8. You should follow your analytics I learnt from watching my stats the there was an interest in Melbourne’s public sculpture. What the public wants to read about art is different to what many arts writers want to write about. There are a lot of different kinds of feedback that you can get on blogs from comments to stats. Lots of stats, numbers of subscribers, views, repeat views. In ten years I’ve had approximately 537,000 views from 155 countries around the world (still no views from Greenland, Cuba, Iran, South Sudan and various central African countries). Stats can be addictive – you get the idea.
    9. Blogs can be works of art.My blog isn’t but the artist Peter Tyndall’s blog was exhibited at the NGV in 2013’s Melbourne Now exhibition and there are other less notable examples.
    10. It is hard work but satisfying

You are your own boss, your own editor and you make your own deadlines. Ignore the advice about blogging that you have to post regularly. Writing a blog may not be for everyone but it has worked for me and I will continue.

[Source:-Arts Hub]

Walking the National Farm Machinery Show with a blogging friend

Unverferth-gooseneck-hitchWe got an early sneak peek at some new tools at the National Farm Machinery Show with blogger and friend Daryl Bridenbaugh – check them out.

The National Farm Machinery Show is a hot place to be in Mid-February and there’s plenty to see. Our team works to capture as much new equipment and tech as we can, but there’s also a fun FIN tradition. Our blogger Daryl Bridenbaugh and his wife, Peggy, join us for the day before after they’ve spent time walking through the facility.

They see things that catch their interest and using that as a guide, we pull together a little preview gallery. This year is no different. This gallery offers you a quick look at a few interesting items that’ll e on hand for visitors to the show. We also found that many exhibitors were still getting their spaces ready for doors to open, yet we still found some interesting tools for an early look.

So click away to see some interesting items we found at the show.

[Source:-Farm Industry news]

Create a Blogging Guide for Your Small Business Blog

Have you created a blogging guide for your small business blog? Why do you need one?

At first glance, blogging may seem to require little effort. Just sign up for WordPress, get a hosting company, grab a nice skin (or theme) for your blog, and then start writing. Simple, right?

In theory, it really can be that simple. But, if you’re serious about blogging, it often takes passion — for the topic you’re writing about and for the people who will be helped by reading it. This means that you will probably need time to craft posts that are so valuable that it’s almost impossible for them to not be helpful (even to at least one person).

 

It also means that it will be helpful if you can be consistent about sharing quality information over an extended period of time. This is not easy to do (yep, personal experience talking) and the ability to regularly share content will mean that you have to be clear about the main topics you’ll write about.

In order to do all those things well, you will have to be focused and kick distractions to the curb. The process is not always easy to execute. In fact, before you pull out your laptop or tablet and fire up WordPress, you should think about the …

Things You Should Do BEFORE You Start Writing

Ideally, before you write any post, you should have a plan — not just for your individual posts, but also for the process you’ll use to craft juicy pieces of content. This doesn’t mean that you can’t write spontaneous and inspired posts. Of course, you can.

Recommended for YouWebcast, February 16th: Build Your Growth Roadmap in a Day

But, it can help to have a plan so you can capture and funnel your blog ideas into a repository (like Evernote or Trello) for safekeeping until it’s time to turn them into fully developed posts.

How to Create a Blogging Guide

image: http://cdn2.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Plan-Before-You-Write.png.png

Create a Blogging Guide for Your Small Business Blog

Do you have a blogging guide for your small business blog?

So, you will need to come up with some guidelines (a.k.a blog writing system) that you’ll follow and include things like:

  • Capturing blog ideas. How will you keep track blog ideas and resources? Will you use a specific app (like the one’s I mentioned above) or write your ideas down in a notebook?
  • Length of blog posts. Will your blog posts be epic (2000 words or more)? Short and sweet (300-500 words)? Or, somewhere in between? Will you shake things up a bit and have a combination of both epic and short posts?
  • Types of posts. How do you feel about list posts? What about posts that recap interviews with industry leaders and influencers? Will you have a recurring topic? Will you create a blog series? Would you consider created some posts that only have images and videos and no text?
  • Posting schedule. Will you schedule posts once per week? Several times per week? Will you write about specific themes on specific days? Oh, yeah, and will you add guest bloggers to the mix? If yes, what criteria will you use to accept or decline their posts?
  • Writing habits. Will you write every day? Will you write and schedule several posts at once? Will you write the post on the day is scheduled to be published or a day in advance?
  • Using an editorial calendar. Will you use a calendar to plan your posts across several months or will you “write from the heart” and when the mood strikes you? What type of editorial calendar will you use: digital, paper-based, or a plugin?

 

When you answer these questions (and any others that come up for your specific situation), you’ll know what you’re working with, so to speak. This will be, in essence, a guide for you to follow every time you decide to put your fingers to your keyboard.

You will know exactly what you’re aiming for and this will give you a direction to go in. In other words, you’ll have a clear plan that’s reasonable to follow and keep up with. Planning in advance (start now!) will save you time and conserve your brain power so you can get on with focusing on writing your posts.

What’s your secret sauce? Do you use a blogging guide for your blog?

[Source:-B2C]

Create a Blogging Guide for Your Small Business Blog

Have you created a blogging guide for your small business blog? Why do you need one?

At first glance, blogging may seem to require little effort. Just sign up for WordPress, get a hosting company, grab a nice skin (or theme) for your blog, and then start writing. Simple, right?

In theory, it really can be that simple. But, if you’re serious about blogging, it often takes passion — for the topic you’re writing about and for the people who will be helped by reading it. This means that you will probably need time to craft posts that are so valuable that it’s almost impossible for them to not be helpful (even to at least one person).

 

It also means that it will be helpful if you can be consistent about sharing quality information over an extended period of time. This is not easy to do (yep, personal experience talking) and the ability to regularly share content will mean that you have to be clear about the main topics you’ll write about.

In order to do all those things well, you will have to be focused and kick distractions to the curb. The process is not always easy to execute. In fact, before you pull out your laptop or tablet and fire up WordPress, you should think about the …

Things You Should Do BEFORE You Start Writing

Ideally, before you write any post, you should have a plan — not just for your individual posts, but also for the process you’ll use to craft juicy pieces of content. This doesn’t mean that you can’t write spontaneous and inspired posts. Of course, you can.

Recommended for YouWebcast, February 16th: Build Your Growth Roadmap in a Day

But, it can help to have a plan so you can capture and funnel your blog ideas into a repository (like Evernote or Trello) for safekeeping until it’s time to turn them into fully developed posts.

How to Create a Blogging Guide

image: http://cdn2.business2community.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Plan-Before-You-Write.png.png

Create a Blogging Guide for Your Small Business Blog

Do you have a blogging guide for your small business blog?

So, you will need to come up with some guidelines (a.k.a blog writing system) that you’ll follow and include things like:

  • Capturing blog ideas. How will you keep track blog ideas and resources? Will you use a specific app (like the one’s I mentioned above) or write your ideas down in a notebook?
  • Length of blog posts. Will your blog posts be epic (2000 words or more)? Short and sweet (300-500 words)? Or, somewhere in between? Will you shake things up a bit and have a combination of both epic and short posts?
  • Types of posts. How do you feel about list posts? What about posts that recap interviews with industry leaders and influencers? Will you have a recurring topic? Will you create a blog series? Would you consider created some posts that only have images and videos and no text?
  • Posting schedule. Will you schedule posts once per week? Several times per week? Will you write about specific themes on specific days? Oh, yeah, and will you add guest bloggers to the mix? If yes, what criteria will you use to accept or decline their posts?
  • Writing habits. Will you write every day? Will you write and schedule several posts at once? Will you write the post on the day is scheduled to be published or a day in advance?
  • Using an editorial calendar. Will you use a calendar to plan your posts across several months or will you “write from the heart” and when the mood strikes you? What type of editorial calendar will you use: digital, paper-based, or a plugin?

When you answer these questions (and any others that come up for your specific situation), you’ll know what you’re working with, so to speak. This will be, in essence, a guide for you to follow every time you decide to put your fingers to your keyboard.

You will know exactly what you’re aiming for and this will give you a direction to go in. In other words, you’ll have a clear plan that’s reasonable to follow and keep up with. Planning in advance (start now!) will save you time and conserve your brain power so you can get on with focusing on writing your posts.

[Source:-B2C]

4 Simple Blogging Platforms You Should Know About

you don’t already know, content marketing is one of the most affordable and effective means of getting your brand out there. And in an age where the internet is increasingly dominated by social networks, is it still worth it to launch a blog? The answer may vary, but some people believe social networks have made blogging stronger, because they deliver content to more people.

Nowadays, creating a blog is a really easy thing to do, as there are services for all tastes and objectives. In addition, today’s major platforms offer numerous features, giving users the options to provide any kind of service.

Among the many tips necessary to launch a successful blog, choosing the right platform is important. WordPress, Medium and other platforms are quite well-known, but there are several other free options you should know about. Check out these four simple to use, alternative blogging platforms that will improve your content marketing strategy:

Pancake.io

Very simple and straightforward, Pancake.io is powered by Dropbox. To use it, simply drop a Markdown-formatted content file into the Dropbox folder the app creates for your site. Those files can use .md, .txt or .markdown as an extension.

If you are not familiar with Markdown, the default template comes with demo content, so you can get the gist of it before you get started.

Commaful

Formerly known as Pencil, Commaful is a blogging platform clearly dedicated to the new generation of millennials. It makes the reading experience much easier and intuitive, as stories there are shown in slides with character count limits.

With these engaging visuals and easy to read format, Commaful is a great option for those who want to share short stories in a new and more visual way.

Postach.io

Dubbed “the easiest way to blog,” Postach.io is a truly innovative blogging platform. Built by the people behind Evernote, it heavily relies on this system to function – in fact, it lives on Evernote.

In order to use Postach.io, users simply need to have Evernote installed and connect a notebook to Postach.io’s platform. Then, any notes inside that notebook that have the tag “published” will be posted, right after Evernote is synced. Easy as 1-2-3.

Pen.io

Pen.io system is quite different from what we are used to. Its sign up requires no personal information at all – you just need to choose a URL and establish a password. With that, your own page on Pen.io is created. Unlike other platforms, each page is really a single page, as there no individual posts.

Every time you want to add a new “post”, simply update your page or create a new one. To update your page, just go to yoururl.pen.io/edit and make your changes. It supports images as well which, to be uploaded, can just be dragged to the page.

[Source:-Tech co]

Blogging Best Practices CMA Webcast

The Construction Marketing Association (CMA) announces a national webcast-Blogging Best Practices-with a focus on the architectural, engineering, and construction (A/E/C) industry. The webcast will be Thursday March 16, 2017 at 1 pm CST.

CMA Chairman Neil Brown will moderate a panel discussion and discuss blog design optimization, blog content planning, a blogging best practices checklist, and results measurement. Kevin Enke, Bosch Power Tools Marketing Director, and Gabe Santi, Granger Construction Marketing Director, will share examples of blogging. Other panelists to be announced.

?Content marketing is the hottest topic in marketing, and blogging can be the engine behind content marketing,” states CMA Chairman Neil M. Brown. ?The webcast will demonstrate how content and blogging builds search authority and thought leadership, drives sales leads, and social media engagement.”

To register for the free Blogging Best Practices Webcast,
link to: http://www.constructionmarketingassociation.org/CMI_Events.cfm.

###

ABOUT CMA
The Construction Marketing Association (CMA) provides professional development and training, resources and information, networking and recognition to marketers in the construction industry. CMA sponsors the annual Construction Marketing STAR Awards, and the Certified Construction Marketing Professional (CCMP) program. Full information on the association is available on the website at http://www.ConstructionMarketingAssociation.org. The site links to the award-winning Construction Marketing Blog with marketing news, resources and related content, and the association’s Twitter, Facebook, Google+, YouTube and LinkedIn pages. Questions? Contact Neil Brown at 630-868-5061.

ABOUT Kevin Enke
Kevin Enke is Bosch Power Tools Group Brand Manager-Digital. His experience includes retail, independent (hardware) co-op, lumber yards and industrial supply. His teams have won awards for packaging and merchandising from GDUSA, Home Channel News Golden Hammer, National Hardware Show and NRHA. Kevin oversees BeThePro contractor community, winner of multiple CMA STAR Awards. He serves on the Construction Marketing Association (CMA) national board of directors. Prior to Bosch, Kevin had marketing roles at Square D, ISR, Marketing Support (agency), and Wilton Industries. He holds a Bachelor degree from North Central College, Naperville, IL. Connect with Kevin in LinkedIn.

ABOUT Gabe Santi
Gabe Santi is the Director of Marketing for Granger Construction, a Lansing, Michigan commercial construction company. Gabe earned Bachelor of Arts degrees in both Journalism and Advertising from Michigan State University. A veteran marketer, Gabe has a background in strategic communications, higher education marketing and digital analytics. Throughout his career, Gabe has implemented several digital initiatives including multiple website redesigns and has managed all website, blog, social media and content marketing functions for Granger since April 2016. Under Gabe’s leadership, Granger’s redesigned website and blog launched in June 2016 and has resulted in significant increases in key website metrics like sessions, users and pageviews. Additionally traffic to Granger’s website from social media has increased nearly 1,500% since launch. Gabe is a CMA member.

ABOUT Neil M. Brown
Neil Brown is Chairman of the Construction Marketing Association. He has been CEO of numerous marketing consulting and creative agencies for the past 15 years, managing some of the biggest brands in the construction sector including Emerson Electric, USG and Bosch Tools. Prior to the agency-side, Brown was a brand manager at electrical products marketing powerhouse IDEAL Industries, and later CMO of an architectural metals manufacturer. Neil is a frequent speaker, author and contributor to BtoB magazine, Advertising Age, Marketing Week and the Construction Marketing Blog. He holds a BSMarketing from Southern Illinois University, and an MBA from Northern Illinois University. In 2012, he published the book, Tools of the Trade: Modern Marketing for Construction Brands.

[Source:-PNY]

I Used Social Media and Blogging to Become Famous for Nothing

I Used Social Media and Blogging to Become Famous for Nothing

In 2006, I set out to brand myself. I had an idea that I shared with the owner of the small company at which I was employed. I called it “Publish or Perish,” and despite the lack of originality, the idea was simple, but purposeful: We needed to elevate the name recognition of our company — quickly.

The company had made a fortune working with a niche client, but unwisely, it chose to fly under the competition’s radar. In other words, it did the opposite of marketing for fear that if competitors knew how much money it was making from this niche client, it would face stiffer competition. So naturally, after years of this “guerilla obfuscation,” the niche client business dried up and now left the little-firm-that-couldn’t struggling to sell its wares to prospects who knew nothing of our work, history and values, or even if we could deliver on our promises. Rapid marketing needed to be done.

Publish, perish and politics.

With publish or perish, I argued, our team of very talented organizational designers, trainers and safety professionals would publish articles and thus get our name out there to get it associated with expertise in our industry. Well, my idea fell flat. A mousey woman with no actual marketing experience, education or aptitude had the top dog’s ear and whispered sweet gibberish into it. Print publication was dead, she said, so were trade shows. The answer was social media. We needed a Facebook page, but most importantly we needed to blog.

Related: Why Your Small Business Must Start a Blog

I resisted, of course. I had no interest in blogging, which I still hold is, in the majority of cases, self-important dreck and a platform for those whose writing just isn’t good enough for publication. (I feel even less beneficent toward self-published books; if it isn’t eligible for academic and literary citation, I don’t see any value to it, but hey that’s just me.) At this point I might throw out a conciliatory “there are some top-shelf blogs out there…blah blah blah,” but that’s not my style. Good bloggers know when their work is good and don’t need my validation. As for the rest of you, well if you read my statement about most blogs being dreck and thought I was talking about you, I probably was. Deal with it.

Despite my protestations I was ordered to blog. I fought and threw a tantrum to no avail, so I finally acquiesced, on one condition: I would write what I wanted without anyone else having a say-so. I also managed to convince my leaders to allow me to submit abstracts and begin a public speaking campaign. I soon learned how to become famous for nothing by using social media, key words, the Google Search algorithm and press releases. Quickly I became the Brook Shields of Safety — she’s always been famous and has big bushy eyebrows, and no one can account for either — I was famous for no apparent reason.

Press and public speaking.

I quickly learned that the true power of public speaking is the press before the event, promotion during the event and press after the event. At the time most of the major print magazines were scrambling for online content and had robots or interns using key word searches to get it. The Google algorithm leaned heavily on how many links a given post had (reasoning that the wider the distribution the more reliable and important the content).

By using a free press release site and a handful of key words carefully and artfully woven in — words like “aerospace” “automotive industry” and…well, false modesty prevents me from giving away all my secrets. Anyway, this site would blast my press release to publications looking for those key words and soon my press releases were on scores of pages, unread and unvetted. I was able to get my press releases, which had usually been run as articles, into minor and major business publications which I won’t name because they are competitors of Entrepreneur (which by the way, never fell for this Machiavellian scheme of mine).

Related: 4 Simple Steps to Creating Powerful Press Releases

Even today there are news outlets that aren’t as judicious as they had ought to be. Fox News routinely posted my Entrepreneur articles, assuming that I was a conservative business writer, until someone eventually got around to actually reading my work, and it was unceremoniously removed from the site.

The PR service allowed me to Tweet the press release, share it on Facebook and post it to LinkedIn. I used to post the links separately to LinkedIn because that way I could post it as a discussion topic in all 50 groups to which I belonged. For some reason, I keep getting thrown out of the groups on LinkedIn because many are run by the adult equivalent of the uptight high school girl who reached the pinnacle of her life and career by being voted third-runner-up for homecoming queen and alternate on student council. Such people ain’t buying what I’m selling.

It wasn’t long before I was an annual speaker at the National Safety Council, until I pointed out that in my obnoxious estimation several of their perennial speakers were nothing but snake oil salesmen, an embarrassment to the profession. I don’t burn my bridges, I dynamite them and pelt the repair crew with hot stones as they try to rebuild.

Posting and Peru.

It wasn’t long before my blog following grew: I’ve always said I’m a bit like watching an abandoned warehouse fire. You’re not glad that it’s burning, but it’s fun to watch the spectacle and nobody really gets hurt — or, if they do get hurt they should have known better than to have been inside it to begin with. I got a notice from www.wordpress.com that today is the seventh anniversary of my blog. It’s actually older than that, but I put it on ice for a while when the owner of my company finally got around to reading it and insisted that I get it approved before publishing. As is my wont, I recommended he engage in congress with himself and offered interesting and inventive suggestions of where he might consider sticking his approval. This did not look good on my review.

On WordPress, I have posted in the neighborhood of 364,000 words, plus I have spoken at over a 100 international and local venues, including an address to an International Safety Conference on Mining in the Andes, in Lima, Peru. This despite my only knowledge of mining safety at the time was to stay the hell out of one. I have 167 works in print, and I was named by the largest safety magazine to both its list of “The Most Influential People Working in Safety” and “The Young (or Relatively Young) Up and Comers in Safety.” This despite the fact I’m not young. (I am often mistaken for being younger than I actually am because of my full head of hair, youthful skin and gross immaturity.)

Related: 9 Practices for Achieving Emotional Maturity

The point I am yet again meandering around is that people try desperately and pathetically to use just one social network to build their personal brands when the true secret is to use all social media outlets as tools to get their brand out there, by using them holistically. Oh, and it helps if you can write, if your message and style are distinctive, and if your brand is of interest. Remember, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him think.

[Source:-Entrepreneur]

Guest Blogging: The Winning SEO Strategy Most Bloggers Miss

Most of us think of Search Engine Optimization as a feat of technical wizardry, and it can be. From using proper keywords to using tools to automate publishing to social media, being tech savvy plays a big role in getting traffic. The mistake is forgetting that readers don’t just have favorite blogs; they have their specific interests. Taking your content and commentary beyond your blog can help build authority and drive a lot of traffic your way. That’s where guest blog posts can be an effective tool. In 2014, Google’s Matt Cutts declared guest blogging dead because it had become “too spammy.” So why do it? Because Google rewards quality, and a comprehensive, high-quality guest post that links back to your site is at least equally good for SEO as a great post on your own site. Here are five tips for generating great guest blog posts:

1.Write for the audience you’re reaching

Don’t presume the audience that reads your own blog is the same as the one where you’ll be guest posting to because – even if your buyer personas overlap – it’s not. Assuming so would be not only ignorant but also arrogant. Read the blog you’re writing for. View the top posts. Are they listicles? Long-form narrative? Are they filled with images and infographics? Be prepared to deliver a consistent experience to the reader who shows up to your post. If the content is either unfamiliar— or worse, unhelpful — expect not to get invited back.

Recommended for YouWebcast, January 24th: The Science of Attention and Growth Marketing

2.Use relatable examples

Once you know what your reader is interested in, use relatable examples to teach. Say you want to write the perfect guest post for Positionly. A quick review of the home page shows articles fit in any of eight different categories: SEO, Updates, Content, Inbound, Social, Infographics, Copywriting, and SEM. Say you have the expertise to share in social media marketing. Write a post that gives your best advice to Positionly readers — for example, how to use qualitative research to give your audience the content they most desire — and then submit to the right category, using keywords that reflect your knowledge of the subject.

3.Link internally

Once you’ve demonstrated expertise, as a guest author, it’s your job to also demonstrate the expertise of the site owner and other guest contributors. For a social media marketing article, you could reference Jini Maxin’s advice for how to handle Facebook Instant Articles or Rohan Ayyar’s tutorial on Pinterest marketing tactics. Adding these links will not only boost the SEO of your host — but you’ll also be adding the reflected authority to your own site, which gets the backlink. Everyone wins.

4.Promote your work and your partner’s site

Speaking of social media marketing, manners and common sense dictate that you share what you write as a guest blogger. After all, the site owner has lent you space and rightly expects that you’ll lend the eyes and ears of your network in return. For example, you could excerpt a portion of your article to share as a full post on LinkedIn and then cross-post to Medium. You could also share these gateway posts several times on Twitter or host a chat about the topic using Facebook Live. Remember: the failure of some bloggers to extend this courtesy—opting for spam over service to a captive audience—is at least part of the reason why Google’s Cutts declared guest blogging dead two years ago.

5.Be the first to comment, and then encourage more discussion

Finally, don’t let the publication of your post be the end of your work. Start a discussion about the topic and help your site partner engage their readers. Post your comment as a question on social media and link back to your post. And then respond to every single question that comes in. At the very least, you’ll earn the well-deserved gratitude of your host. At best, you’ll start a discussion about a crucial topic and win massive amounts of traffic to your partner, and an instant invitation to write again — and perhaps for a few related sites, as well. What’s more, you can also distribute your article organically on various platforms such a growthackers.com, inbound.org or any other … to give it some additional buzz.

Either way, this kind of guest posting will give your SEO a serious boost without you having to alter a single line of HTML code.

[Source:-B2C]

Prepped And Ready: Blogging On A Saturday

Good morning everybody.

Since inclement weather postponed a bunch of basketball games on Friday, I figured that we should also delay the publication of our last Prepped And Ready blog of the week. It’s a little hard to preview Friday basketball games when schools across the area are postponing their athletic events until Saturday.

But basketball fans can breathe easy. We’re expecting highs in the 60s this afternoon, so I doubt that there are many weather-fearing administrators who are going to call off today’s games.

The area’s weather-related delays closed out a busy week at the American-Statesman. In addition to covering the athletic postponements on Friday, we were also writing about realignment and Signing Day this week.

And in case you missed it, here are the stories that we worked on this week:

  • “Recruiting twists and turns end with Waz signing with Baylor” by Danny Davis
  • “Lake Travis’ Nixon explains 11th-hour flip to TCU” by Jay Plotkin
  • “Local football players deliver their signatures on Signing Day” by Danny Davis
  • “Area athletes set to play at the college level” by Danny Davis
  • “Class 6A’s arrival poses new challenges” by Rick Cantu
  • “Realignment sacks Burnet-Liberty Hill rivalry” by Danny Davis
  • “Area schools learn fates on UIL’s realignment day” by Danny Davis
  • “State tournament will mean road trip for area wrestlers” by Sean Shapiro
  • Faces Off The Field: Vandegrift wrestler Tristan Prukop

Let’s blog.

A HISTORY LESSON

During the fall, we taught you about the last 18 football seasons at a handful of schools. Throughout the winter and spring, we will be using this slot to look back at some of the Austin area’s state champions.

The 1994-95 Westlake girls basketball team

Record: 36-4

Coach: Cathy Self

Championship recap: After beating Class 5A’s top-ranked team in the state semifinals, Westlake recorded a 59-56 win over second-ranked Duncanville in the classification’s championship game. Turnovers spoiled a fourth-quarter lead for the Chaparrals, but Krista Watson scored off her own steal to give Westlake a 57-53 lead with a minute left in overtime. Kendra Harrell then hit two free throws with 1.3 seconds left to ice the 59-56 win.

Interesting tidbit: Self won three championships at Westlake before an acrimonious split following the 1999-00 season. Self became Duncanville’s coach in 2000, and she has led the school she beat in 1995 to four state championships (Duncanville even bested Westlake in a 2003 Class 5A semifinal game). Winners of the last two Class 5A championships, Duncanville will enter the 2014 postseason with a 98-game winning streak.

ONE-ON-ONE

At an on-campus signing ceremony on Wednesday, Hendrickson honored seven of its seniors.

Defensive lineman Kourtland Busby (New Mexico State), quarterback Xavier Conley (Navarro), defensive lineman Anson Friday (Midwestern State), wide receiver Latrell Martin (Houston) and defensive back Chance Waz (Baylor) all signed their national letters of intent in front of family members and teammates. Running back Samaje Perine (Oklahoma) and defensive back (Trai Mosley) were not in Pflugerville on Wednesday, but they were also recognized at the ceremony.

Icaught up with Martin after the ceremony to talk with him about Houston Cougars, his recruitment and what it was like to play this season against a few of his future teammates.

SIX FOR SATURDAY

Looking for a basketball game to go to on Saturday? Here are six that may be worth your time.

1. Round Rock vs. McNeil (girls basketball): Round Rock and McNeil ended up tied in fourth place in the District 16-5A standings, so the two teams will battle on Saturday for the district’s final playoff spot and the right to play District 15-5A’s Bowie next week. This play-in game will feature two of the area’s top seniors as Round Rock’s Kala Green and McNeil’s Troi Swain were both McDonald’s All-American nominees this winter. This game at Cedar Ridge High is set to begin at 1 p.m.

2. Akins vs. Del Valle (boys basketball): Akins and Del Valle are tied for fourth place in the district standings, so this game could end up deciding who will win District 15-5A’s final playoff berth. Akins, which recorded a 61-44 win over Del Valle on Jan. 14, will close out the regular season on Tuesday against last-place Westlake. Del Valle will play Lake Travis, the district’s champion, on Tuesday. This game at Del Valle High is set to begin at 4:30 p.m.

3. Vandegrift vs. Rouse (boys basketball): Dripping Springs is heading to the playoffs, but not much else has been decided in District 25-4A as Cedar Park, Leander, Rouse and Vandegrift are all within 1.5 games of each other. Vandegrift (6-5 in District 25-4A) beat Rouse (6-4) earlier this season, but the Raiders could get their revenge with a win that would also eliminate the Vipers from postseason contention. This game at Rouse High is set to begin at 7 p.m.

4. Manor vs. Bastrop (boys basketball): Manor and Bastrop have both secured playoffs spots, but don’t expect either team to take it easy in this rematch of Manor’s 66-59 win on Jan. 14. Manor is currently tied atop the District 17-4A standings with a Georgetown team that it will close out the regular season against on Tuesday. Bastrop is the district’s fourth-place team, but the Bears are only a game behind Connally. This game at Bastrop High is set to begin at 3 p.m.

5. Bandera vs. Wimberley (boys basketball): With two games left in the regular season, Wimberley sits in fourth place in the District 27-3A standings with a 3-5 mark in district play. Fifth-place Geronimo Navarro is 2-7. So if the Texans can beat third-place Bandera on Saturday, they’re in the playoffs. But if the Texans lose, Tuesday’s regular season finale against Geronimo Navarro just got a lot more interesting. This game at Wimberley High is set to begin at 2 p.m.

6. Hendrickson vs. McNeil (boys basketball): McNeil is heading to the playoffs and Hendrickson isn’t. But with McNeil sitting a game out of first place, can the Hawks spoil McNeil’s dreams of a District 16-5A championship? This game at McNeil High is set to begin at 1 p.m.

Thanks for joining us on this special Saturday. Enjoy your weekend.

[Source:-Statesman]

Broker highlights benefits of blogging

One successful broker has underscored how helpful it can be to invest time and energy into devising a thoughtful social media strategy.

When discussing his marketing strategies and how he generates leads for his brokerage, Graeme Salt of Chan & Naylor Finance emphasised the benefits that have come from running his own blog, which he uses to educate his clients.

Speaking to The Adviser on the Elite Broker podcast, Mr Salt explained that the main idea behind his blogs is to be seen as a trusted adviser for his clients.

He elaborated that he subscribes to the philosophy that “if you grow a beautiful garden in the first place, then butterflies come to you,” in order to be the go-to person that his clients come to when they’re ready to buy.

Mr Salt addressed the common difficulty that many brokers face when it comes to keeping a blog: time constraints. He said that he usually writes something as he is about to go to work, and highlighted to other brokers that “there are lots of resources out there”.

“In our case, we can have articles drafted for us, which is quite good. I also put one of my brokers in contact with a ghost writer who can write for her as well.”

Acting as a mentor for other new brokers who join his aggregator has also been mutually beneficial for Mr Salt’s business.

“It allows us to give them support as they grow their business,” Mr Salt explained. “Now, I’ve got 20-odd mentees under my wings. What tends to happen is that as they’re coming up to 18 months, two years, I’m actually talking to them about, ‘Well, what would you do in the situation?” Bouncing ideas off them.”

Mr Salt elaborated that it is within his business’ culture to “marry up” people who can support each other.

“We have people who will look after each other. I had a call today from one of my guys in the Gold Coast, who was asking me some questions. I said, ‘You know, one of our brokers in Point Cook down in Victoria has done this. Give her a call.’ They were more than happy to help each other,” he said.

[Source:-The Advisor]