Google updates kids animation app Toontastic 3D with new Cars 3 and Fruit Ninja themes

Earlier in the year, Google released the impressive Toontastic 3D. The digital storytelling app was a follow up to the original Toontastic game by educational developer LaunchPad Toys, which was acquired by Google in 2015. The app allows kids to draw and animate their own stories to create a 3D video. The budding directors can even narrate their creations and add built-in songs to the soundtrack before sharing. In the latest update, Google adds new characters and settings as part of two additional themes.

The first of the new themes is movie tie-in with the imminent Cars 3. The Disney/Pixar franchise is incredibly popular with young children, and they will surely relish the chance to create their own Cars story arcs. They’ll be able to animate their anthropomorphic hero Lightning McQeen, alongside new additions to the series such as Jackson Storm, Cruz Ramirez, and Miss Fritter, against the backdrop of two locations from the film: Florida 500 raceway and Thunder Hollow demolition derby.

A behind-the-scenes video tour of Pixar’s studios will also be included in the app, in a bid to show kids how real animated films are made and further stoke their interest in filmmaking. It’s worth noting that the Cars 3 theme will only be available for a limited time, up to September 30th.

The second set of new characters available in this Toontasic 3D update comes from melon-slicing game Fruit Ninja, or more specifically from the animated YouTube series Fruit Ninja Frenzy Force. You’ll be able to take control of protagonists such as Peng, Seb, Niya, and Ralph, leading them into battle against their nemesis, Clean Bee. It’s unclear how long the Fruit Ninja theme will be available, but I’d suggest making the most of it soon – just in case.

If you (or your kids) haven’t tried it yet, I’d thoroughly recommend the app. It really gets the balance right between fun and education. You can download or update to the latest version of Toontastic 3D via the Play Store link below, or grab it manually from APKMirror.

[“Source-androidpolice”]

Create A Scrollable Widget Full Of App Icons Using ‘Foldery’

There are a ton of apps for Android that allow you to improve your productivity. As this is Android we’re talking about, you have far more freedom than you’d have on iOS, for example. There are apps that can boost your messaging experience, multitasking, and even change the look and feel of your entire home screen while adding some extra features into the mix. Well, we’re here to talk about an app called Foldery Multicon Folder Widget’ or ‘Foldery’ in short, which is basically a widget that will help you organize your home screen in a unique way, read on.

Many of you probably have quite a few icons on your home screen, and some of you are probably reluctant to use too many home screen pages. Well, with Foldery, you can create scrollable widgets and place app icons inside of them. You can essentially create a 1-by-1 widget on your home screen and place a number of icons inside of it. You can go through them by swiping either vertically or horizontally, that’s totally up to you. If your launcher allows you to, you can resize this widget and truly take control of what will it look like. The app also allows you to manipulate the size of the icons you include, you can make them huge, or simply use the standard size, it’s totally up to you. You can also increase the number of columns you’d like to use in a widget, change the background of the widget, and Foldery also supports icon packs, which means you can use whichever icon pack you want, as long as it is installed on your smartphone.Foldery worked great during our testing, and the app is very well designed, it’s not exactly in line with the latest Material Design guidelines, but it looks nice and it’s fairly easy to navigate. One thing to keep in mind, however, is that you can create only 1 Foldery widget in the free version of this application, if you’d like to add more of them, you’ll need to make an in-app purchase. Interesting enough, you have 5 levels of contributions to choose from, ranging from ‘Patronage’ to ‘Coconut Cocktail’, which essentially means you can choose how much you’d like to pay for the app, though do keep in mind that you won’t be able to pay less than $1. All of these aforementioned options will give you access to ‘Foldery Premium’, and this is a one-time payment.

[Source:-AH]

 

Zazu is a cross-platform app launcher with plenty of tricks up its sleeve

Zazu is a cross-platform app launcher with plenty of tricks up its sleeve

As a minimalist, I love keeping my desktop neat and free of clutter. That means I have to resort to using an app launcher of some sort to find my favorite software.

I’ve tried using just the Start menu, as well as different docks and other tools. But I’m starting to enjoy using Zazu a whole lot. This simple text-based launcher invokes apps in a pinch, and is also extensible thanks to support for plugins that you can build yourself. Oh, and it works on Mac, Windows and Linux.

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Simply install Zazu and bring it up by hitting Alt + Space; you can then search for any app on your computer, look up a term on the Web, run system commands like shut down, and even do arithmetic calculations and conversions. If you’ve tried Alfred on OS X, you’ll find the interface to be fairly similar.

There are customizable plugins available from Zazu’s site to do things like save multiple items to a clipboard and searching through your Chrome bookmarks. What’s particularly exciting about the app is that anyone can build and contribute plugins to extend its functionality.

However, it isn’t perfect: While using it to look for apps on Windows, Zazu frequently surfaced the uninstaller for the programs I looked up, because they were in the same folder. It’d be nice to see these blacklisted by default, along with options to hide other search results from the app manually. I also couldn’t get the file finder feature to track down documents, images and music files stored on my hard drive.

Still, it’s a neat app that stays hidden until you need it and makes light work of launching your programs from wherever you are. I’m hopeful that it’ll gain traction among folks who can code and grow its library of plugins to become even more useful.

[Source:-TNW]

APP of the day |Energy Bar – Foldery Multicon Folder Widget| 3rd Jan, 2017

APP of the day |Energy Bar- Foldery Multicon Folder Widget

This program is based on smartphone app review, where we’ll discuss apps and their amazing features.

Today we are going to review – Energy Bar

How to rearrange the Samsung Gear S3’s app drawer and widgets

You can easily tame some of the chaos that is the Gear S3’s app and widget situation.

With so many apps, services and utilities available on Samsung’s Gear S3 smartwatches, it’s easy to get carried away while setting things up and all of a sudden be in a stressful situation. Dozens of apps across multiple pages of the app drawer sit beneath a dozen pages of widgets to the right of your watch face — but thankfully you can clean up this situation to make it easier to get just what you want.

While you can’t altogether hide or delete most of the pre-installed apps on the Gear S3, you can rearrange them in a way that puts what you want front and center, leaving the rest to the background so it isn’t in the way. Here’s how to get it done.

Configuring widgets

Widgets on the Gear S3 are the glanceable bits of information that are available to the right of your watch face. You can think of them as full-screen app experiences that are always available to you, without having to explicitly launch an app. By default Samsung loads up the Gear S3 with a bunch of widgets, and you can even install more on your own. Either way, you can have as many or as few as you see fit — adding as much functionality or simplicity as you desire.

Editing widgets on the Gear S3

This is how you configure widgets on your Gear S3:

  1. Rotate the bezel clockwise to view a widget on screen.
  2. Press and hold anywhere on the screen to activate “Edit mode”.
    • Rotate the bezel to select widgets to interact with.
    • Press the – button to remove a widget.
    • Press and hold a widget, dragging it left or right to rearrange its position in the list.
  3. To add more widgets, rotate the bezel clockwise to the very end of the list and tap Add widget.
  4. Select the widget you want, then press and hold the widget to rearrange its position in the list.

Rearranging the app drawer

For all of the apps on your Gear S3 that aren’t worthy of their own dedicated widget, you can open up the app drawer by pressing the home button while on the watch face. Just like your phone, the app drawer holds every app that’s installed on the watch, and by default is placed in a haphazard order. Samsung defines the app drawer on its own terms, and any additional apps that you download are put at the very end of the list — which could mean scrolling through three or four pages before you get to it.

Editing apps on the Gear S3

But it doesn’t have to be that way for long — here’s how you can rearrange your apps:

  1. Go to your watch face and press the home button to enter the app drawer.
  2. Press and hold on the center of the screen to enter “Edit mode”.
  3. Rotate the bezel to the page you want to rearrange.
  4. Press and hold the app you want to move, drag it to its new position, and lift your finger to place it.
    • To move an app between pages, drag the app to the multi-colored circular page indicator at the 1 or 11 o’clock position.
    • If an app can be uninstalled, it will have a red on the corner of the icon; tap it to delete and confirm with the check mark.
  5. When you’re finished editing, press the back button to exit Edit mode.

Once you spend a few minutes getting both the widgets and app drawer on your Gear S3 set just how you like them, you’ll find it much easier to access the information you need when you need it. Skip over the distraction of unused apps and widgets, and take control of your smartwatch!

[SOURCE:-Android Central]

Today in History App Adds Support for Apple Watch and Widgets

Downshift LLC is proud to announce the release of Today In History 4.1.0, a major update to their popular educational app for its iPhone, iPod touch and iPad line. Today In History offers the best way to get key facts about iconic global events and fun facts from across the centuries delivered right to your mobile device. Version 4.1.0 brings the best of history to your wrist and home screen. The new update reveals the Today In History Apple Watch app, a new widget for your home screen, and a few other goodies.

“Today In History on your Apple Watch and the widget for iOS further cements our promise to be everywhere our users are, explained Manuel Zamora, founder at Downshift LLC. “Make sure that TIH users have access to history, when they need it. Now you can see the most important events of the day, on your Watch, while you’re getting a coffee or glance at them on your homescreen while reading your latest texts.”

The Apple Watch app offers a streamlined version without sacrificing content, while the widget grants a concise look at headlines for those on the go. No update is complete without awesome new features and bug fixes. Our update also includes:

* Improvements to viewing events, adjustable text and image sizes.
* Ability to share quotes.
* Improvements for notifications.
* And a significant speed increase
* Various bug fixes and data cleanup.

“Over 250k Today In History events are seen each day on people’s iPhones and iPads,” adds Brandon Trejo, Content Manager, at Today In History. “That number should go up now that people find it much easier see our events, and the ability to share quotes gives you that little something to stay in touch with your uncle’s cousin’s second wife.”

Today in History provides headlines, quotes and stunning images of important historical events. Whether you are an avid history buff or a casual trivia-time fan, Today in History has something for every user – and the latest version is just the beginning of larger updates to content and features coming soon.

Device Requirements:
* iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch
* Requires iOS 9.0 or later
* 28.5 MB

Pricing and Availability:
Today In History 4.1.0 is Free and available worldwide through the App Store in the Education category. There is also an Android version available on Google Play. To learn more about Today In History and check out some of history’s greatest hits, visit its official website.

Today In History 4.1.0
More Info
Download from iTunes
Download from Google Play
Screenshot
App Icon

Based in Los Angeles, CA and founded in 2009, Downshift LLC, is a scrappy mobile development company that aims to provide users with applications that are simple, unique, entertaining. The creators of such favorites as Today In History, Riddle Me This, and Quote Seeker, Downshift LLC strives toward providing quality applications that allow for increased connectivity, enjoyment and ease-of-use. Copyright (C) 2016 Downshift LLC. All Rights Reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPod and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries.

[Source:-Pr mac]

Today in History App Adds Support for Apple Watch and Widgets

Los Angeles, California – Downshift LLC is proud to announce the release of Today In History 4.1.0, a major update to their popular educational app for its iPhone, iPod touch and iPad line. Today In History offers the best way to get key facts about iconic global events and fun facts from across the centuries delivered right to your mobile device. Version 4.1.0 brings the best of history to your wrist and home screen. The new update reveals the Today In History Apple Watch app, a new widget for your home screen, and a few other goodies.

“Today In History on your Apple Watch and the widget for iOS further cements our promise to be everywhere our users are, explained Manuel Zamora, founder at Downshift LLC. “Make sure that TIH users have access to history, when they need it. Now you can see the most important events of the day, on your Watch, while you’re getting a coffee or glance at them on your homescreen while reading your latest texts.”

The Apple Watch app offers a streamlined version without sacrificing content, while the widget grants a concise look at headlines for those on the go. No update is complete without awesome new features and bug fixes. Our update also includes:

* Improvements to viewing events, adjustable text and image sizes.
* Ability to share quotes.
* Improvements for notifications.
* And a significant speed increase
* Various bug fixes and data cleanup.

“Over 250k Today In History events are seen each day on people’s iPhones and iPads,” adds Brandon Trejo, Content Manager, at Today In History. “That number should go up now that people find it much easier see our events, and the ability to share quotes gives you that little something to stay in touch with your uncle’s cousin’s second wife.”

Today in History provides headlines, quotes and stunning images of important historical events. Whether you are an avid history buff or a casual trivia-time fan, Today in History has something for every user – and the latest version is just the beginning of larger updates to content and features coming soon.

Device Requirements:
* iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch
* Requires iOS 9.0 or later
* 28.5 MB

Pricing and Availability:
Today In History 4.1.0 is Free and available worldwide through the App Store in the Education category. There is also an Android version available on Google Play. To learn more about Today In History and check out some of history’s greatest hits, visit its official website.

Today In History 4.1.0
More Info
Download from iTunes
Download from Google Play
Screenshot
App Icon

Based in Los Angeles, CA and founded in 2009, Downshift LLC, is a scrappy mobile development company that aims to provide users with applications that are simple, unique, entertaining. The creators of such favorites as Today In History, Riddle Me This, and Quote Seeker, Downshift LLC strives toward providing quality applications that allow for increased connectivity, enjoyment and ease-of-use. Copyright (C) 2016 Downshift LLC. All Rights Reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPod and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries.

[Source:-Pr Mac]

New iOS 10.2 beta 2 features: new TV app with single sign-on, Siri live tune-In and more

New iOS 10.2 beta 2 features: new TV app with single sign-on, Siri live tune-In and more

A week after seeding the first iOS 10.2 beta test to developers, Apple Inc. has now seeded the second version.

The latest features for iOS 10.2 beta 2 include the new TV app, which the company introduced at its Oct. 27 event, as well as a TV widget. IOS 10.2 beta 2 also includes tweaks for Apple Music and a new SOS feature.

These new features join the various changes that were introduced last week with iOS 10.2 beta 1. They include the ability to preserve your camera settings, new emojis, a Videos widget, new wallpapers and full-screen animations.

If you are already part of the Apple Developer Program you can get the iOS 10.2 beta 2 as an over-the-air download. If you are part of the public beta program, the iOS 10.2 beta 2 will likely be available later this week. Apple plans for several of the new changes in iOS 10.2 to be available to the general public in December.

TV app

At Apple’s MacBook Pro event, the company also introduced a TV app that will allow users to discover and access TV shows and movies from multiple apps on Apple TV, iPhone and iPad. The TV app, which has been introduced with iOS 10.2 beta 2, also includes support for Single Sign-On, Live Tune-In with Siri and a Store where users can buy iTunes content, TV subscriptions and see recommendations.

The TV app stays in sync across your Apple TV, iPhone and iPad so you can start watching on one device and pick off where you left off on another.

Cable subscription – Single Sign-On

When iOS 10.2 beta 1 was seeded to developers last week, Apple introduced Single Sign-On for certain cable networks, allowing users to sign in once on their Apple TV, iPhone and iPad and get access to their pay-TV subscription content.

Single Sign-On is currently only supported for Dish Network, GVTC Communications, Hotwire and Sling TV.

To enable Single Sign-On, open the Settings app > TV Provider > select your provider > enter your username and password.

Tip: To disable Single Sign-On, open the Settings app > TV Provider > tap on your account name > tap Sign Out.

Live Tune-In with Siri

With the TV app you can use Siri to tune into live news and sporting events on Apple TV, allowing users to simply say “Watch the Stanford game” or “Which games are on right now?” In addition, Siri can provide live scores and take a viewer directly to the live stream of the game in the relevant app. Users will no longer need to navigate to the live stream within a specific app, for example, they can say “Watch CBS News” and Siri will direct them to CBS’ live stream.

TV widget

To coincide with the launch of the TV app, Apple has also introduced a TV app widget, which you can access from your Lock or Home screen by swiping right.

To add the TV widget tap Edit at the bottom of the widgets screen > find the TV widget > tap the ‘+’ green icon next to TV widget > tap the Done button in the top right.

Read our iOS 10 widgets article to learn more about adding, removing and completely disabling widgets on your iPhone and iPad.

SOS feature

Apple has introduced a new SOS feature that will automatically contact emergency service’s if a user presses their iPhone’s power button five times. At this stage, the SOS feature is available in the U.S., U.K., Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Russia and Spain.

To enable the SOS feature, open the Settings app > General > toggle the button next to “Click Sleep/Wake to Auto Call.” If you want a warning sound to play during the countdown to the emergency services’ call, you can also enable “Countdown Sound.”

Apple Music updates

In the first beta of iOS 10.2, Apple introduced new sorting features for Apple Music, allowing users to sort playlists by type, title, and recently added, as well as sort songs and albums by title or artist.

Apple Music has also received slight tweaks in the second beta of iOS 10.2 with the introduction of more prominent Shuffle and Repeat buttons.

[Source:-Sillicon Angle]

Today in History App Adds Support for Apple Watch and Widgets

Downshift LLC is proud to announce the release of Today In History 4.1.0, a major update to their popular educational app for its iPhone, iPod touch and iPad line. Today In History offers the best way to get key facts about iconic global events and fun facts from across the centuries delivered right to your mobile device. Version 4.1.0 brings the best of history to your wrist and home screen. The new update reveals the Today In History Apple Watch app, a new widget for your home screen, and a few other goodies.

“Today In History on your Apple Watch and the widget for iOS further cements our promise to be everywhere our users are, explained Manuel Zamora, founder at Downshift LLC. “Make sure that TIH users have access to history, when they need it. Now you can see the most important events of the day, on your Watch, while you’re getting a coffee or glance at them on your homescreen while reading your latest texts.”

The Apple Watch app offers a streamlined version without sacrificing content, while the widget grants a concise look at headlines for those on the go. No update is complete without awesome new features and bug fixes. Our update also includes:

* Improvements to viewing events, adjustable text and image sizes.
* Ability to share quotes.
* Improvements for notifications.
* And a significant speed increase
* Various bug fixes and data cleanup.

“Over 250k Today In History events are seen each day on people’s iPhones and iPads,” adds Brandon Trejo, Content Manager, at Today In History. “That number should go up now that people find it much easier see our events, and the ability to share quotes gives you that little something to stay in touch with your uncle’s cousin’s second wife.”

Today in History provides headlines, quotes and stunning images of important historical events. Whether you are an avid history buff or a casual trivia-time fan, Today in History has something for every user – and the latest version is just the beginning of larger updates to content and features coming soon.

Device Requirements:
* iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch
* Requires iOS 9.0 or later
* 28.5 MB

Pricing and Availability:
Today In History 4.1.0 is Free and available worldwide through the App Store in the Education category. There is also an Android version available on Google Play. To learn more about Today In History and check out some of history’s greatest hits, visit its official website.

Today In History 4.1.0
More Info
Download from iTunes
Download from Google Play
Screenshot
App Icon

Based in Los Angeles, CA and founded in 2009, Downshift LLC, is a scrappy mobile development company that aims to provide users with applications that are simple, unique, entertaining. The creators of such favorites as Today In History, Riddle Me This, and Quote Seeker, Downshift LLC strives toward providing quality applications that allow for increased connectivity, enjoyment and ease-of-use. Copyright (C) 2016 Downshift LLC. All Rights Reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPod and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries

Today in History App Adds Support for Apple Watch and Widgets Image
[Source:-PR Mac]

How to create a widget for your Android app

create-an-android-app-widget-feature-image

Android app widgets may look pretty simple – essentially, they’re just small windows that users embed in an App Widget Host, typically their device’s homescreen – but your average application widget has a lot to offer.

For users, widgets help them make the most of all that homescreen real estate that would otherwise go to waste. And for developers, creating a widget to accompany your latest Android app is a way of delivering a better user experience (and if you want those 5 star reviews then you should seize anyopportunity to deliver a better user experience) plus a well-designed app widget is a useful tool for keeping your app at the forefront of the user’s mind.

Every time the user passes through their homescreen, your widget has an opportunity to catch their interest by presenting them with a snippet of your app’s most important content – ideally tempting them into launching your app.
In this article, I’m going to show you how to create an effective app widget for your latest Android project. I’ll be covering all the essentials of creating a basic widget, before sharing some best practices that can help ensure your widget will have no problem securing itself a permanent spot on the user’s homescreen.

Planning your widget

So, you’re sold on the idea of creating an Android app widget, but the first step is deciding what kind of widget you’re going to build.

If you’re struggling for inspiration, then it can help to look at what other Android developers are doing. When you look at all the Android widgets that are currently out there, they can generally be divided into the following categories:

  • Information widgets. Display important information related to your app. Some examples include clock and weather widgets, and widgets that notify the user about new emails or SMS messages.
  • Collection widgets. These vertically-scrolling widgets display multiple elements from the same group, such as a collection of headlines from a news app, or a series of photos from a gallery app.
  • Control widgets. These widgets give users the ability to trigger an app’s most important features from the comfort of their homescreen – kind of like a remote control. A control widget can help your app feel more like an integral part of the user’s device, rather than an add-on that the user opens, plays around with for a while, and then closes. A widget that allows the user to play, pause and skip tracks in a music application is one example of a control widget.
  • Hybrid widgets. Can’t choose between the different categories? Many widgets combine elements from two or more categories – case in point, the music widget from our previous bullet point. Assuming this widget displays some information about the currently-selected track, then this is an example of a control widget that borrows elements from the information widget category. If you do decide to mix and match, then it’s recommended that you target one category first and then add elements from other categories as and when required.
android-widget-hybrid-music-widget-example

An example of an information widget (above) and a hybrid widget (below) that combines elements of a control widget and an information widget.

What are the essential components of an Android widget?

To create a widget, you’ll need the following classes and XML files:

  • An AppWidgetProviderInfo file. An XML file containing important information about your widget, such as its minimum width and height, its layout resource file, how often it should be updated, and whether it uses a configuration Activity.
  • An AppWidgetProvider class implementation. This is where you’ll define the methods that you’ll use to programmatically interact with your widget.
  • An XML layout resource file. Your widget’s initial layout.
  • An App Widget configuration Activity. If you want the user to be able to modify your widget, then you’ll need to create a configuration Activity. This Activity will launch automatically when the user creates an instance of your widget.

There’s no set rules about the order you should create these files and classes in, but I find that it helps to have a clear idea of how your widget will look, before you start worrying about how it’ll function, so I’m going to start by creating my widget’s layout.

Creating your widget’s layout

You define your widget’s layout in the same way you define the layout for any Activity: create an XML layout resource file and add all the UI elements you want to use.

The only major difference is that widget layouts are based on RemoteViews, so you can only use layouts and views that RemoteViews supports.

Specifically, when you’re creating your widget’s layout you can use the following layout classes only:

  • FrameLayout
  • GridLayout
  • LinearLayout
  • RelativeLayout

And you can use the following widget classes only:

  • AdapterViewFlipper
  • AnalogClock
  • Button
  • Chronometer
  • GridView
  • ImageButton
  • ImageView
  • ListView
  • ProgressBar
  • StackView
  • TextView
  • ViewFlipper

Any layout you create should look good and function correctly across a wide range of different screens, however when it comes to widget layouts you have some extra motivation for ensuring you layout is as flexible as possible:

  • Users typically place widgets on their homescreens, and although all Android homescreens are divided into a grid, the exact number of cells, spacing and sizing will vary between devices. Your widget needs to be flexible enough to handle all the different homescreen grids it may encounter.
  • Users expect to be able to resize widgets horizontally and vertically, so your widget should meet these expectations unless it has a very good reason not to. This means your layout needs to be able to cope with however the user chooses to resize your widget.

Creating a flexible widget layout follows many of the best practices you’ll be familiar with from building other Android layouts, but in particular you should:

  • Provide alternate versions of all your layout’s resources. These alternatives should be optimized for a range of different screen configurations. The Android system will then select the best version of each resource to use at runtime, based on the current device.
  • Create a density-independent layout. Make sure you specify all layout dimensions using density-independent pixels (dpi) and use flexible units of measure, such as “wrap_content” and “match_parent,” rather than absolute units.
  • Test! Make sure you test your widget across a range of screen configurations by creating multiple Android Virtual Devices (AVDs). If you do discover issues with a particular screen configuration, then you may want to create an alternate layout that’s optimized for this particular screen. You should also check that your layout can handle being flipped between portrait and landscape mode, and that it continues to look good and function correctly regardless of how the user resizes it. If you do encounter issues once your widget has been shrunk past a certain size, then you can specify a minimum size for your widget – something I’ll be covering when we create our AppWidgetProviderInfo file.

Create an AppWidgetProviderInfo file

The next step is creating a AppWidgetProviderInfo XML file and defining all the qualities you want your widget to have.

Create a res/xml directory (if your project doesn’t contain one already) and then create a new XML layout inside this directory.

android-app-widget-create-xml-directory

This is going to be our AppWidgetProviderInfo file, so open it and set its root element to <appwidget-provider>. You can now specify all the qualifies your widget should possess – here’s a few examples:

<appwidget-provider xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
// Your widget’s default width and height
   android:minWidth="50dp"
   android:minHeight="50dp"

// How often your widget should be updated, in milliseconds
  android:updatePeriodMillis="90000000"

// The XML file containing the widget’s layout
   android:initialLayout="@layout/appwidget"

// Whether the user can resize your widget horizontally, vertically, or both (horizontal|vertical). If you don’t
// want your widget to be resizable, then you can set this attribute to "none"
   android:resizeMode="horizontal|vertical"

// Even if you follow all the best practices for designing a flexible layout, if a user keeps shrinking your
// widget indefinitely then at some point it’s going to become unusable. Prevent the user from pushing your
// layout to its breaking point, by assigning it a minimum height and width
   android:minResizeHeight="30dp"
   android:minResizeWidth="30dp"

// Specify whether your widget can be displayed on the homescreen, (home_screen), the lockscreen (keyguard)
// or both - although only devices running Android 4.0 and lower support lockscreen widgets. Lockscreen
// widgets aren’t particularly private, so if you do give the user the option of placing your widget on their
// lockscreen then just make sure your widget doesn’t feature any sensitive or potentially embarrassing
// information!
   android:widgetCategory="home_screen">
</appwidget-provider>

Create Your AppWidgetProvider class

The AppWidgetProvider class is where you’ll define the methods that will be called during the widget’s lifecycle, for example whenever a widget is deleted, enabled or disabled. This class is also where you’ll create the code that’ll ultimately be responsible for updating your widget.Create a new Java class that extends the AppWidgetProvider class and override its update methods. In my example, I’m going to be using MyAppWidgetProvider.

 

[Source:-Android Blog]